Everyone’s Hiding Something – Night Moves Review

Harry Moesby (Gene Hackman) is a private investigator working in Los Angeles, who is hired by a wealthy woman named Arlene Iverson (Janet Ward), who’s teenage daughter Delly (Melanie Griffith) has gone missing. He eventually shows up in the Florida Keys, where the girl’s stepfather Tom (John Crawford), runs a charter business with his plane […]

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Watch Your Back – Three Days Of The Condor Review

Robert Redford plays a CIA researcher who is sent on the run when he discovers his six coworkers dead, in Sydney Pollock’s 1975 paranoid thriller Three Days Of The Condor. Pollock creates an atmospheric New York setting, beautifully utilizing the city’s most notable landmarks, and frames the city as an imposing backdrop. Another notable aspect […]

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The Bank Robbery As Circus – Dog Day Afternoon Review

Al Pacino garnered his fourth consecutive Best Acting Oscar nomination in 1975 for his performance as Sonny in Dog Day Afternoon. Sonny, along with his partner, Sal (John Cazale), start the film off by botching a bank robbery in Brooklyn. When they find all the money in the safe has already been picked up, and […]

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The Pitfalls Of Excess – Shampoo Review

Hal Ashby followed up his successful run of early 70’s cinematic triumphs trifecta of The Landlord, Harold & Maude, and The Last Detail with 1975’s sexual and political satire Shampoo. Starring Warren Beatty as a Lothario hairdresser named George, who finds himself juggling three women at once surrounding a 24 hour period during the 1968 […]

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Kubrick’s Picturesque Vision: Barry Lyndon Review

1975 marked an incredible year for American film with an embarrassment of riches throughout the industry. One Flew Over The Cukoo’s Nest, Dog Day Afternoon, Shampoo, Jaws, and Nashville just to name a few of the titles. Largely forgotten despite it’s four Oscar wins is Stanley Kubrick’s breathtaking masterpiece Barry Lyndon. Starring Ryan O’Neal as […]

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Performance: Max Von Sydow in The Seventh Seal

Antonious Block (Max Von Sydow) is the Knight who returns from the Crusades to only find Death waiting for him on his home soil, in Ingmar Bergman’s The Seventh Seal. One of many films that dealt with the question of mortality, god, and philosophy to come out in the post World War Two era. Block […]

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Happy 4th Of July – The Best Vietnam War Films

For those of us residing in The United States Of America, Wednesday is July, 4th the day we celebrate our independence from England. Patriotism, military service, and historic events all surround the holiday and I thought it was a great opportunity to highlight the best films regarding The Vietnam War. The war shaped the mood […]

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Hope and Despair: Paul Schrader’s First Reformed

First Reformed is a film that has been fifty years in the making. Going all the way back to the start of director Paul Schrader’s film criticism career. He wrote a book on spiritual cinema called Transcendental Style In Film that covers the work of Yasujiro Ozu, Robert Bresson, and Carl Dreyer. Schrader had not […]

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Altman’s Ode To 1930’s Jazz: Kansas City

Involving a pair of kidnappings in the 1934 criminal underworld, Kansas City places us in a world with a distinct atmosphere where Jazz is plentiful and the feeling that anything can happen is around every corner. Robert Altman crafts a distinctive world surrounding the 1930’s Jazz scene. And does an excellent job with music that […]

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The Great Human Drama as Mosaic: Short Cuts

Robert Altman collected one of the most diverse and talented cast of actors for his ambitious and sprawling 1993 film Short Cuts. Taking place over the course of a few days in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley, we follow well over twenty characters as they intersect with one another amid their life events. […]

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Altman’s Anti-Western: McCabe And Mrs. Miller

The atmosphere created for this small town in the Old West makes it feel distinctly non- western, like an independent film that just so happens to be set in the same time and location. The film’s biggest accomplishment is that it immerses you into a world that feels totally tangible and accessible while drawing us into it’s drama.

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Altman’s Hip And Cool Noir – The Long Goodbye Review

While the movie has an aloof style that matches the attitude and disposition of Marlowe, it’s a real world. Complete with violent consequences, unsavory characters, and the abyss always lurking on the surface. All that Marlowe has is an orange cat….

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Violence Solves Nothing – Bad Boys (1983) Review

Bad Boys is that life lesson that truly reaches out from the streets of Chicago to illuminate our understanding of humanity through the eyes of teenagers who don’t understand the weight of their actions.

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The Sentimental Melodrama of ’83: Terms Of Endearment Review

Narratively, Terms Of Endearment leaves a lot to be desired in terms of interesting characters or dynamic storytelling. This is a very slow, deliberate, and melodramatic look at the struggles of a married mother of three who never seems to catch a break and is constantly struggling to get a grasp on life.

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Fatalistic Entertainment: Videodrome Review

Max Renn (James Woods) is the President of cable channel 83 named Civic TV. Specializing in X-Rated content as a TV station, Max is always looking for the next shocking content to attract viewers. On a TV show panel he defends his content choices by being a small station and needing to survive. On the […]

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Coppola’s Dream Familial Noir: Rumble Fish Review

Rusty James (Matt Dillon) longs for the days of gang warfare and the loyalties borne out of life in the gritty streets of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Rumble Fish is the tale of a local street tough trying to live up to the perceived reputation of his older brother Motorcycle Boy (Mickey Rourke). We’re taken by Director […]

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Happiness Is Not To Be Trusted – Tender Mercies Reveiw

Tender Mercies won the Best Actor Academy Award, and Best Original Screenplay when the event was held in the early months of 1984. Written by Horton Foote, who had previously worked with Robert Duvall on the adaptation of To Kill A Mockingbird – and reccomended him for this role. Duvall gives a subtle and nuanced, […]

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American Psycho – The Unfilmable Novel

Despite all of the controversy that surrounded the 1991 novel American Psycho and it’s author Bret Easton Ellis, it only took 9 years for the book to be optioned and filmed. Starring Christian Bale as protagonist Patrick Bateman, American Psycho takes us back to the decadence of the 1980’s on Wall Street and the surreal […]

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A Clockwork Orange: Kubrick’s 1971 Controversial Masterpiece

Alex DeLarge (Malcom McDowell) is the leader of a street gang in a slightly futuristic London who inflicts ultra violence with his mates on the unsuspecting residents about town. After committing a series of beatings and rapes, Alex is betrayed by his three other gang members and is arrested by the police. Alex is sentenced […]

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The Dude Abides – The Big Lebowski Review

Lebowski

It all starts with the destruction of a rug that really tied the room together. Jeff “The Dude” Lebowski (Jeff Bridges) suffers a break in at his Los Angeles apartment in which his living room rug is urinated on and the rest of his place is trashed. This and the rest of the story that […]

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Happy Birthday Carey Mulligan

Carey Mulligan

Carey Mulligan broke onto the acting scene with 2009’s An Education, getting nominated for Best Actress in a leading role at the 2010 Academy Awards. Today May 28, we celebrate Carey Mulligan’s brilliant performances that she’s given to the world of cinema. There is a soulful vulnerability that Mulligan brings to her characters, able to […]

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