You Can’t Stop What’s Coming: No Country For Old Men Review

  Winning Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Adapted Screenplay Academy Awards in 2008, No Country For Old Men solidified the careers of Joel and Ethan Coen with their best film they’d ever made. To make a statement like that, you’d have to be pretty sure of the artist’s other work. I […]

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Neo-Noir Gangster Prohibition Pulp: Miller’s Crossing Review

The title of the review really spells out the experience of the visually virtuosic prohibition gangster picture Miller’s Crossing. The third release from Joel and Ethan Coen is an immersive and atmospheric look at the disagreement and dust up between two warring gangs. The local Irish and Italian mobs are at odds with one another […]

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The Coen Bros. 1940’s Writer’s Block Odyssey: Barton Fink Review

Barton Fink centers around playwright and aspiring Hollywood screenwriter of same name who finds the transition a harrowing, odd, and anxiety inducing descent into madness. Fink, played by veteran acting great John Turturro, is a nervous and sensitive Jewish artist looking to expand on his broadway success. And make some money while he’s at it. […]

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The Visual Virtuosity of Sam Peckinpah’s Straw Dogs

The controversy surrounding Sam Peckinpah’s 1971 thriller Straw Dogs comes from a moment in the film that depicts one of the most harrowing rape scenes in cinematic history. Straw Dogs is also one of the most visually inventive, well edited, and stylistically fresh films I’ve ever seen. Peckinpah has an incredible ability to piece a […]

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Jack Nicholson turns 81

Today we celebrate the 81st birthday of legendary actor Jack Nicholson. Through a magnificent career of great performances and memorable moments make up the catalogue of a storied Hollywood career. Three of my favorite performances come to mind that have cemented themselves as iconic. The first is Nicholson’s role as Jake Gittes in Roman Polanski’s […]

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Happy Birthday Seth Rogen

Seth Rogen has been a part of my life since my early teenage years. I have a strange love and affection for a man I’ve never met but I feel I’d get along with. His Birthday is today April 15th, and with that said I’d like to take a look back at his wildly successful […]

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I Am Jack’s Broken Heart: Fight Club Review

Fight Club is an absolute insane movie to try to explain and it’s impact on popular culture at this point is complete. Based off the 1996 book by writer Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club follows a singular narrator played by Edward Norton through corporate life and the drone of existence in modern America. Unable to sleep, […]

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We All Hate Our Job – Office Space Review

Positioned between the technological boom of the 90’s and the panic of the upcoming Y2K scare, Office Space is a satirical comedy about the banality of corporate life and the soul crushing existence of a cubicle career. Peter, Michael, and Samir all work at Initech, a technology company that updates bank software for the year […]

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Look Closer: The Decay of the American Dream in American Beauty

“My name is Lester Burnham. This is my neighborhood; this is my street; this is my life. I am 42 years old; in less than a year I will be dead. Of course I don’t know that yet, and in a way, I am dead already.” What a movie! American Beauty truly was the best […]

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Mount Rose American Teen Princess – Drop Dead Gorgeous Review

One of the more under the radar films of the notable year that was 1999 is the mockumentary Drop Dead Gorgeous. Starring a varied and talented cast, we find ourselves in a small town in Minnesota called Mount Rose. A camera crew has arrived to cover 1995’s American Teen Princess beauty pageant and interview it’s contestants […]

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A Game Of Inches – Any Given Sunday Review

“Remember Kev, on Any Given Sunday, anything can happen.” Oliver Stone has made a career out of controversial films that either criticize or outright damn the very institutions society holds up to the highest standard. He went after the military in Platoon, the President in Nixon, The United States government in JFK. The 90’s saw […]

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At The End Of The Rainbow – Eyes Wide Shut Review

Stanley Kubrick sadly passed away just four days after presenting the final cut to Warner Brothers of what would be his last film, 1999’s Eyes Wide Shut. Starring real life couple Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman, Eyes Wide Shut is an exploration of one man’s sexual insecurities and the descent into the darkest parts of […]

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The Alienated Majesty of Travis Bickle – Taxi Driver Review

Screenwriter Paul Schrader’s first creation was a collaboration with Martin Scorsese called Taxi Driver. He came up with the idea when he was going through something of a nervous breakdown and full on personal crisis. He imagined a kid trapped in a Taxi Cab floating through a sewer, getting madder and madder playing with a […]

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King For A Night – The King of Comedy Review

Rupert Pupkin (Robert DeNiro) is obsessed with fame and more directly with his celebrity idol Jerry Langford. Langford is seemingly a fictitious replacement for the real king of late night in America at the time, Johnny Carson. He’s a big star and he’s played by real life comedian and comic actor Jerry Lewis. These are […]

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No One Stays At The Top Forever – Casino Review

There’s a heartfelt and thoughtful monologue heard in voice over by one of Casino’s main characters and protagonist Sam “Ace” Rothstein at the beginning of the film. When you love someone, you’ve gotta trust them. There’s no other way. You’ve got to give them the key to everything that’s yours. Otherwise, what’s the point? And […]

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To Live As A Monster or Die As A Good Man – Shutter Island Review

From the very start of the opening credits we’re introduced to the insistent and recurring score that haunts the 138 minute run time of Martin Scorsese’s Shutter Island. The choppy North Atlantic waters are too rough for Marshall Teddy Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) when we first meet him, head thrust into a toilet bowl aboard a ferry […]

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The Weight Of The Irish – Martin Scorsese’s The Departed

In the early months of 2007 Martin Scorsese’s name was called, winning for the first time in his storied career the Academy Award for Best Director. The film that he won for, The Departed, is an epic and violent saga involving the state police in Boston and the Irish gang they pursue throughout the city. […]

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Review: The Wolf of Wall Street

Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio) is the sole voice and spirit of Martin Scorsese’s 2013 Oscar nominated film The Wolf of Wall Street. And he holds our attention for nearly three hours. Debauchery of every kind is on display, boys will be boys behavior is rampant, cocaine and naked women aplenty. This is the early 90’s […]

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Swinging For The Fences – Annihilation Review

Alex Garland wow’d movie watchers and critics alike with his 2014 Science Fiction/Horror indie Ex Machina. It made three times it’s budget and was a verified hit for the first time Director, even if this wasn’t his first foray into the movies. Garland is also the screenwriter of some very good films including Sunshine and […]

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Paul Thomas Anderson’s 1970’s Hippie Odyssey

Paul Thomas Anderson takes us back to the early 70’s in the beach communities of Southern California in a film that pays homage to Robert Altman’s The Long Goodbye. Inherent Vice is a detective story that is a challenging watch with plenty of digressions, character backstory flashbacks, drug lingo references, and comic absurdities. Anderson emphasizes […]

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Magnolia The Masterpiece

As complicated and intricate as the details might appear or seem in Paul Thomas Anderson’s third feature, Magnolia, they really are quite simple. Set during one day in Los Angeles, Magnolia connects at least a dozen characters as they go on with their lives at various jobs, homes, and otherwise mundane activities. The overriding important […]

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