New Zealand International Film Festival: Picks of the 2018 Festival

It’s the most magical time of year in the New Zealand cinephile’s calendar – the New Zealand International Film Festival. In the deep, dark heart of winter lovers of cinema brave the chill and come together some of the best films from New Zealand and beyond. In a time when it’s so easy to plonk […]

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How Jaws Changed My Life and the World

Like most people, I’ll never forget the first time I saw Jaws. My parents had a copy of Peter Benchley’s original novel on our bookshelf at home. I had always wanted to see the film adaptation. It was scheduled to be shown on television on a Saturday night in 1990. I was six years old and begged […]

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Profondo rosso: A Classic in Deep Red From Dario Argento

I wonder how many of you claim to be die-hard Dario Argento fans, but haven’t even seen his 1975 masterwork, Profondo rosso (Deep Red). Or even 1982’s Tenebrae. I’m sure you’re aware of the Italian slasher sub-genre, Giallo. And the likes of Mario Bava, Tolomeo Bacci, Dino Tavella, Lucio Fulci, Sergio Martino, Umberto Lenzi. And the countless […]

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The Enduring Legacy of The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Every filmmaker hopes their piece of work will go on to become a classic. A film which people watch and discuss for decades to come. Majority of the time, this obviously doesn’t occur. Many films fade from consciousness the minute the credits roll, particularly when they fail at the box office. But every so often, […]

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The 20 Greatest Ingmar Bergman Films: 10 – 6

Into the top ten of Ingmar Bergman’s finest feature films – as voted for by you. Thanks to FilmStruck for their terrific and timely Bergman range. Stay tuned for the final five. 10) Sommaren med Monika / Summer with Monika (1953) WATCH ON FILMSTRUCK US WATCH ON ITUNES US WATCH ON AMAZON UK 9) Tystnaden […]

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Happy Birthday Ingmar! The 20 Greatest Bergman Films: 20 – 11

Today, Ernst Ingmar Bergman would have turned the grand old age of 100. Sadly, Bergman passed away in 2007 (in fact he died on the same day as Michelangelo Antonioni). Bergman left behind a legacy that filmmakers can only dream of, and others have yet to beat. With a record 60 film credits to his […]

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Skammen: Ingmar Bergman Invades Us With A New Depth of Shame

The sounds of war accompany the opening title of Ingmar Bergman’s 1968 film Skammen (Shame). A tad unfamiliar to many Bergman regulars. Following the recent birth of Persona and the upcoming The Hour of the Wolf, this is evidently ample departure from the intimate melancholy, conflict with God, and the questionable status of one’s faith. We also […]

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Filmotomy Podcast Episode 35: Celebrating 100 Years of Ingmar Bergman

The Ingmar Bergman podcast feels like a truly special occasion. To celebrate his centennial year, and to join the rest of the vast Bergman coverage at Filmotomy, this week’s recording is all about the great Swedish filmmaker. Host Bianca Garner, fresh off her own Bergman binge, is joined by Robin Write, and a recently acquired […]

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With the Sins and the Redemption Comes The Virgin Spring

For 1960, The Virgin Spring is a real shape-shifter for the audiences back then fidgeting in their seats at such extraordinary, shocking story-telling. In fact, Ingmar Bergman’s incredible film would have gasps and quivers from today’s audience. A film that is at once beautiful and serene, where innocence is punctured, fundamentals of faith are broken, […]

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Cinema 2018 Half-Time Report: 15 Memorable Performances

Well, there is actually 16… We joined forces to come up with just a handful of our very favourite performances of 2018 in cinema so far. And in this bunch there is more than enough to be proud of. Don’t forget to listen to our recent podcast in which we discuss the first half of […]

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The Problem of Pain: Cries and Whispers Review

Pain is seemingly always around us. Whether it is the pain we inflict upon ourselves or pain that comes unannounced and undeserved, we have all met days where the feeling was visceral and crippling. What are we to do on those days? Why does such pain exist? Cries and Whispers is a film with a […]

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Robbin’ Banks and Hearts: Thieves Like Us

– – – Contains Spoilers – – – America has always been obsessed with the doomed romantic tale of the bank robbing couple on the run. It is their version of ”Robin Hood” or ”Dick Turpin”. There’s something enigmatic about the anti-hero who doesn’t follow the rules of the establishment. Robs from the greedy bankers, […]

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Doubts in the Darkness: Winter Light Review

After growing up in a conservative religious environment, I went through a period in college where I questioned aspects of my faith and went through some serious doubts. I came to the conclusion that, since my faith is the foundation of my life, it’s worth questioning. Because of that personal history, I’ve had an interesting […]

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Gosford Park: A Recipe for Excellence

The appetiser with Gosford Park is carving out an immediate set of finely-tuned, immaculately-drawn characters. Academy Award winner Julian Fellowes ought to still be held in such high praise for a screenplay so devilishly tantalising, word-for-word, that he earns that badge without a mention of Downton Abbey or that he beat Christopher Nolan’s Memento on […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary – Wild Strawberries

When I was told that we were celebrating the 100th Birthday of Ingmar Bergman, I was a little embarrassed by the sheer lack of Bergman films I have watched. I’ve always intended to get around to watching more of the auteur’s filmography, but for some reason life has always gotten in the way. There are […]

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Top 20 Meryl Streep Performances Ranked

The Top 20 performances by Meryl Streep, as voted for by you, is like a treasure chest of golden acting. On the flip side, so sad to see those that did not quite make the final list. But there’s plenty to be in awe of here. Thanks to all who voted. And a huge, huge […]

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Summer with Monika: Ingmar Bergman’s Prelude To A Cinematic Legacy

Summer with Monika

On the cusp of mainstream cinema attention, outside of his native Sweden that is, Sommaren med Monika (Summer with Monika) paved the way, to a great extent, for Ingmar Bergman’s masterworks. Wild Strawberries, The Virgjn Spring, The Seventh Seal, were just three first-rate pictures not far away. Of course, I’m hardly suggesting that Summer with Monika […]

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M*A*S*H: When Robert Altman Went To War And Made Us Laugh

Robert Altman really didn’t want to make M*A*S*H (Mobile Army Surgical Hospital) with a lead actor or one particular plot. This was to be an ensemble, something still new to Altman, as he was relatively new to the filmmaking big league. But the ensemble picture was an accomplished format, one he would feel at home […]

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VOTE – The Greatest Films of Ingmar Bergman

On the 14th July iconic Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman would have turned 100 years-old. Sadly no longer with us, we are extremely passionate about making sure the celebrations are, above all, cinematic. Bergman was a filmmaker who more than earned his acclaim, and any excuse to honor his vast work is a welcome treat. So […]

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A Guide for Bergman Beginners

When I heard that Filmotomy would be doing an Ingmar Bergman series to commemorate what would be his 100th birthday, I could barely contain my excitement! In the last few years, I’ve gone from seeing my first Bergman film (The Seventh Seal) to now holding him up as one of my very favorite directors. I […]

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Masterpiece Memo: The Greek Blues With Rembetiko

Costas Ferris’ extraordinary, sinfully under-seen, Rembetiko from 1983, begins and ends with the music. Literally. Your ears are in for a real Greek treat – baglamas, violin, santouri, bouzouki – the music emerges from the opening frame. From behind the hanging bead pass of a Greek bar, a secluded venue, one of many, for the social […]

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