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*** Not Paid Employment – But We’ll Treat You Like Gold *** You love to write about film, right? Our site Filmotomy is in full-throttle this past year – busier than we have ever been. But that ain’t enough. We have a great team of enthusiastic writers that churn out all manner of pieces. But […]

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Everyone’s Hiding Something – Night Moves Review

Harry Moesby (Gene Hackman) is a private investigator working in Los Angeles, who is hired by a wealthy woman named Arlene Iverson (Janet Ward), who’s teenage daughter Delly (Melanie Griffith) has gone missing. He eventually shows up in the Florida Keys, where the girl’s stepfather Tom (John Crawford), runs a charter business with his plane […]

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Shivers – Humanity Collapsing From Within

Over the years, Cronenberg’s debut film Shivers has gained the reputation for being the ‘thinking man’s horror film’. It’s a film that provided both bloody popcorn for the masses, as well as food for thought. Shivers has undergone a myriad interpretations since it’s release, with some deemed as a attack on the middle class, a […]

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1975 Review: Death Race 2000

Death Race 2000 is one of those films that’s eluded me my whole life. I remember seeing a poster for it about a decade back in a burrito shop that decorated with retro timepieces. It’s tagline, “In the year 2000, hit and run driving is no longer a crime. It’s the NATIONAL SPORT!” glares out […]

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East of Edie: How Grey Gardens Changed the Documentary

Once upon there was a beautiful house that represented the American dream. Inside the house, there were two beautiful, sophisticated socialites, who were part of the upper elite. People to be admired and respected. But, the years passed, and the years were unkind. Slowly, the house began to decay, with the vermin and cats overrunning […]

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Watch Your Back – Three Days Of The Condor Review

Robert Redford plays a CIA researcher who is sent on the run when he discovers his six coworkers dead, in Sydney Pollock’s 1975 paranoid thriller Three Days Of The Condor. Pollock creates an atmospheric New York setting, beautifully utilizing the city’s most notable landmarks, and frames the city as an imposing backdrop. Another notable aspect […]

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The 20 Greatest Ingmar Bergman Films: The Top 5

There’s a tear in my eye as we lose what has been a phenomenal month covering the marvelous works of Ingmar Bergman. Who am I kidding? I’ve been sobbing for three days. Tears of joy, too, I might add. An admiration of the experience watching his films, no matter the mood he leaves us in. […]

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Top Moments in Bergman Films

After finally coming to an end of my Bergman journey over these last 10 days or so, watching a grand total of 13 films (yes, I know there’s a lot more that I need to see, and I do promise to get around to seeing them), I have decided to pick my favourite moments. I […]

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The Bank Robbery As Circus – Dog Day Afternoon Review

Al Pacino garnered his fourth consecutive Best Acting Oscar nomination in 1975 for his performance as Sonny in Dog Day Afternoon. Sonny, along with his partner, Sal (John Cazale), start the film off by botching a bank robbery in Brooklyn. When they find all the money in the safe has already been picked up, and […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary- Summer Interlude

So, this is my final entry in my Bergman diary and it’s been a wonderful journey. I came into this not really convinced that I would enjoy any of Bergman’s films, but I was so very, very wrong. I have enjoyed almost every film I have watched, although there’s been a couple I have not […]

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François Truffaut and Isabelle Adjani: Two of Cinema’s Finest Recall L’Histoire d’Adèle H.

It may be neither here nor there as to how French filmmaking great, François Truffaut, shadowed some strong affections for the brash, bright actress, Isabelle Adjani, during the making of L’Histoire d’Adèle H. (The Story of Adèle H.). The world and backstory of cinema has numerous tales of involvement / admiration / alleged romance between those […]

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The Day in a Life of a Woman: Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

There is nothing quite like the 1975 domestic drama Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles. A three-hour epic, that follows the life of mother, Jeanne (Delphine Seyrig), as she goes about her day completing mundane tasks – such as peeling potatoes, and washing up. But as the film develops, the mundane slips away and […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary- Winter Light

We have all had times where we’ve questioned our faith, whether it’s faith in the terms of a religious sense, or faith in humanity. Bergman was very interested in exploring the lives of characters who dealt with an existential crisis, and used the medium of film to explore his own relationship with his faith, religious […]

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The Pitfalls Of Excess – Shampoo Review

Hal Ashby followed up his successful run of early 70’s cinematic triumphs trifecta of The Landlord, Harold & Maude, and The Last Detail with 1975’s sexual and political satire Shampoo. Starring Warren Beatty as a Lothario hairdresser named George, who finds himself juggling three women at once surrounding a 24 hour period during the 1968 […]

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A Stepford Wives Tale: Looking back at the reaction to The Stepford Wives

In 1975, the feminist movement was finally beginning to get results. This movement is often referred to as the ‘second wave’, and is perhaps the one that made the biggest impacts and changes in the lives of women across the world. By 1975, there had been the following achievements: sex discrimination was made a violation […]

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Kubrick’s Picturesque Vision: Barry Lyndon Review

1975 marked an incredible year for American film with an embarrassment of riches throughout the industry. One Flew Over The Cukoo’s Nest, Dog Day Afternoon, Shampoo, Jaws, and Nashville just to name a few of the titles. Largely forgotten despite it’s four Oscar wins is Stanley Kubrick’s breathtaking masterpiece Barry Lyndon. Starring Ryan O’Neal as […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary – Saraband

It only seems necessary that I watch Bergman’s last film seeing as I watched his first film Torment. Released in 2003, Saraband is a sequel to his 1973 film Scenes From a Marriage. I didn’t actually realise that Saraband was a sequel when I first picked it as part of my Bergman diary, but this […]

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The Stupid – It Burns!! Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

Let me be upfront and clear from the start: I love blockbuster films. I grew up in an era where summer meant big-budgeted Hollywood commercial movies, long lines waiting at multiplexes for the season’s must-see hit of the year, special 12:01 am showings with the casual moviegoer and fans alike, both parties anticipating what the filmmakers […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary: It Rains on Our Love

For my next entry, I decided to visit Bergman’s first directional feature It Rains on Our Love, (Det regnar på vår kärlek). The screenplay was written by Herbert Grevenius and Bergman, based on the Norwegian play Bra Mennesker (Good People). We can certainly see the Bergman we all love and admire emerging behind the camera, […]

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2018 First-Half Favorites: Annihilation

When asked about my favorite movies from the first half of 2018, there’s one film that remains head and shoulders above any other new release I’ve seen this year. This film shook me so much upon my first watch that I went back to watch it again in the theater that very same day. I […]

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