Around the World in 80 Films: Diabolique

Les diaboliques, released as Diabolique in the United States, and variously translated as The Devils or The Fiends, is a chilling psychological horror that still stands up today. The story blends elements of thriller and horror, with the plot focusing on a woman and her husband’s mistress who conspire to murder the man. After the crime […]

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Around the World in 80 Films: Summer with Monika

Summer with Monika

Summer with Monika is a 1953 Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman, based on Per Anders Fogelström’s 1951 novel of the same title. It was controversial abroad at the time of its first release for its frank depiction of nudity, but due to this reputation the film was a huge success. Without a doubt, its […]

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NZIFF 2018 Review: American Animals

American Animals

I have to be completely honest- I’m not a fan of films that have anything to do with heists. It’s not my jam. However, I went into American Animals as a completely blank slate, without expectations and I came out better for it. And considering it was my first film on my NZIFF 2018 schedule, I wasn’t […]

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Blimey! Here’s 100 British Flicks That Are The Dog’s Bollocks – III

Hold your horses. We have our own civil war in Great Britain, to rival any of yours. Between the Southern Fairies and the Northern Monkeys. You think we’re a united nation. Ha. Up north we have scraps, spice, or cheese on our chips, whereas down south they walk up and down the apples and pairs. […]

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God’s Lonely Creature: Revisiting Robin Williams’ in One Hour Photo

A picture tells a thousand words. In a world obsessed with appearances and our image, we place a lot of emphasis on the importance of a photo. One Hour Photo (2002) deals with the pursuit for the perfect image, and the need to appear important to the outside world. The film follows Sy Parrish (Robin […]

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Watch: Tribute video “Robin Williams …a friend like you”

Man oh man. How do you pay your respects to man who is no longer with us? And not just in the literal sense. A master of comedy, drama, stand-up, brightening up our worlds. Tragically, Robin Williams left this world 4 years ago today. I could honor the ultimate funny man every day of the […]

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British Cinema: Brief Encounter

David Lean is probably most famous for his legendary epics like Lawrence of Arabia, which is why I was so intrigued to watch his 1945 film Brief Encounter for the first time. This is the opposite of epic. As the title suggests, it is focused on small, quick interactions. Its timeline is quite short – […]

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The Receptionist

Many of us have fallen on hard times, trying to make our pennies stretch until the end of the month, worrying about how we will find the money to pay for rent. The main character Tina (played by the exceptional Teresa Daley) in The Receptionist is in dire financial straits, trying to find work but […]

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Blimey! Here’s 100 British Flicks That Are The Dog’s Bollocks – II

Where thou, a rose. A rose, thateth smells as sweet. By the name of, erm. A rose that hast, another name wonst smell as sweet. No, will smell as sweet. So, thy name of any other rose willst, the smell will taste as sweet. Oh, bugger thine self. While this fair knave doth figure this […]

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New Zealand Screenings: The Final Blade

Willie Ying is the Kiwi filmmaker and rising international star you’ve never heard of, but his backstory is one that sounds like a film plot in and of itself. Coming to Auckland at the age of 12 and attending Kelston Boys’ High School in the 1990s, he was the target of bullies. But like any […]

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Blimey! Here’s 100 British Flicks That Are The Dog’s Bollocks – I

Atonement

Cup of tea? A bun? Fish and chips for tea? Depends how much dough you have in your sky rocket. Why not go to the pictures instead? You’ll need a few quid, mind, probably cost you a bloody tenner for that bag of Maltesers and orange Fanta. No wonder we’re skint. So then, take a […]

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Femme Filmmakers Festival: 2018 Full Line-Up Announced

Femme Filmmakers Festival is an online film festival showcasing the works directed by women. This year’s event runs Friday 7th September – Sunday 16th September 2018. Promoting and encouraging live viewings, with details of where to stream / watch. This includes feature films and a curated selection of short films. Special focus on certain directors, […]

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Filmotomy Podcast Episode 38: What Is British Cinema?

The British are coming in the latest podcast from Filmotomy. The many compounds of the UK film industry is examined by two Brits, Bianca Garner and Robin Write, and they are joined by Rob Motto from America, and Doug Jamieson from Australia. Discussion looks out how we might class a film as British, including how […]

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Exclusive Interview: Michael Ferrell Writer & Director of Laura Gets a Cat

If you read my previous review of Indie comedy, Laura Gets a Cat, you would know just how much I enjoyed it. When offered the opportunity to interview writer and director Michael Ferrell, I jumped at the chance. Filmotomy would like to thank Michael and Chris Prine (the producer on Laura Gets a Cat) for […]

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Around the World in 80 Films: Dogtooth

Dogtooth comes from the warped mind of Yorgos Lanthimos, who divided audiences with last years brilliantly wonderful, if not disturbing film The Killing of a Sacred Deer. Dogtooth is Lanthimos’ second feature, but is perhaps the one that garnered him the most attention. As despite its controversial subject matter, it won the Prix Un Certain […]

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Money! Money! Money! Generation Wealth Review

Just what can money buy you? Status, class, authority, respect, infamy, a presidency? The list of things you can gain with a little (or rather a lot) of green, is endless. In the Western society, money makes the world go around. However, we all know the old saying: Money can’t buy you happiness. Certainly, we […]

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Around the World in 80 Films: L’Avventura

How have I never seen L’Avventura? This was the question I found myself asking after finishing the 1960 classic film directed by Michelangelo Antonioni. As a film student I was aware of L’Avventura, and it’s impact on cinema, but I just had placed it on my ”to watch” list and had moved on with things. […]

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Not Another Dumb Blonde: Mansfield 66/67

Despite being dubbed as another dumb blonde to rival Marilyn Monroe,  Jayne Mansfield was actually a genius with very high IQ, of 163. In addition to English, she spoke four other languages. She learned French, Spanish, and German in high school, and in 1963 she studied Italian. Reputed to be Hollywood’s “smartest dumb blonde,” she […]

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Indie Review: Malady (2015)

Hurt people, hurt people. I’m not sure where I first heard that phrase, but it came to mind repeatedly as I was watching Jack James’ 2015 indie film Malady. I’ve always considered that phrase, not as an excuse for hurts one levies on another, but as context. Pain and grief corrupt and linger. Their influence […]

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Around the World in 80 Films: Au Revoir Les Enfants

For my first film on the Around the World in 80 Films event, I decided to watch Louis Malle’s autobiographical Au Revoir Les Enfants, which I have read about but have never have had the chance to watch. I am aware that director Malle based the film on his own experiences as child growing up in […]

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Uncensored Cinema: There’s No Film Quite Like Possession

Possession opens in West Berlin, the crosses implanted into the ground to commemorate the dead, and the dividing wall very much a part of the film’s surroundings. Polish director, Andrzej Żuławski, didn’t want to make a wholly political film per se, just scratch at the conflict with a statement. With it, the whistling, thudding, typical […]

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