FISA (Film Integrated Soccer Association) World Cup 2018

There is no official such party as the Film Integrated Soccer Association (FISA), but it exists as long as we can combine football / soccer with the world of film. And so that is what we did. Combining the format of the current World Cup with our love for movies. International cinema. Let’s get down […]

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Altman’s Hip And Cool Noir – The Long Goodbye Review

While the movie has an aloof style that matches the attitude and disposition of Marlowe, it’s a real world. Complete with violent consequences, unsavory characters, and the abyss always lurking on the surface. All that Marlowe has is an orange cat….

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”I yam what I yam.” Why Popeye is Altman’s forgotten masterpiece

Popeye wasn’t the commercial bomb that many believe. In fact the film grossed $6 million on its opening weekend in the U.S., and made $32,000,000 after 32 days. Although the film’s gross was decent, it was nowhere near the blockbuster that Paramount and Disney had expected, and was thus written off as a flop.

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How Robert Altman Drove the Cinema Bus into Seventies Glory and Beyond

The musical became Nashville, the private dick, The Long Goodbye, and the psychodrama, Images. Thieves Like Us was the deglamorized gangster flick, California Split the chaotically atmospheric gambling pic. The language of American film had begun to evolve again, after a very long nap.

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Vilmos Zsigmond – Images from a Renegade Camera

He broke every rule in the standard cinematographers’ catechism – and caught much flack for it early in his career. Then people began to catch on. This was a new visual language, an impressionistic wash that Zsigmond applied that elevated the films – and the directors he worked for – into a unique category, all their own.

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Play Violet For Me- Review

The archetypal figure of the double is cinema’s most often used trope to communicate notions of the uncanny. By definition, the double resembles the familiar original, yet remains another, a stranger. As ontologically both lie in the realm of the visual, it seems somewhat natural that cinema plays so well and often with the doppelganger […]

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Let’s get critical: A new study confirms that film critics are mostly white men

What do Roger Ebert, Peter Travers, David Edelstein, Glenn Kenny, Owen Gleiberman and Mark Kermode all in common? Well, three things: firstly their occupation, secondly their gender and lastly their ethnicity. A recent study conducted by USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, entitled ‘Critic’s Choice’ has confirmed something that I have been aware about […]

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VOTE – the Greatest Performances of Meryl Streep

With Meryl Streep‘s birthday coming up, its the perfect time to honor the ridiculously brilliant career of the actress. Now in her fifth decade of lighting up the silver screen, Streep’s career as an actress has been not only consistently good, but the roles she has undertaken offer such variety and depth. Probably the most […]

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Testament (1983) – When the Worst Happens

The secret to Littman’s film is that there is no proselytizing. We don’t see the bomb explode; we don’t know the political circumstances or which megalomaniac (elected or dictator) started the deluge. We only see things from the point of view of the innocent who pay for the folly with their lives.

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Take My Breath Away: In Defence of 1983’s Breathless

Breathless looks music-video slick and drips with style, creating the sense of a heightened reality set on the streets of L.A. This is the nouvelle vague for the MTV generation. The story and characters in both films may seem similar, but to call the 1983 Breathless a remake is a naive assumption.

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Violence Solves Nothing – Bad Boys (1983) Review

Bad Boys is that life lesson that truly reaches out from the streets of Chicago to illuminate our understanding of humanity through the eyes of teenagers who don’t understand the weight of their actions.

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Gorky Park – Doing Business in Moscow Can Be Murder

We all enjoy being stumped by riddles like Why is a raven like a writing desk? A riddle is a mental puzzle, a brain teaser much like a good mystery. Well, here’s another riddle. Question: Why is Gorky Park like the U.S. presidential election? Answer: It’s a story about a corrupt American businessman, Russian collusion, and a coverup designed […]

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Filmotomy Podcast Episode 31: Are Animated Films Just For Kids?

Animation is the topic of discussion for the podcast this week. And just how child-friendly the genre has been over its cinematic evolution. Our fair maiden, and host, Bianca Garner helps paint the picture with Daniel Smith-Rowsey, Rob Motto, and Jonathan Holmes. And they all put forward their notions of the animated film, how it […]

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This is Your 30s: My Full-Circle Experience With The Big Chill

A few key moments standout from my experiences with the world of cinema as a child. The first time I saw Jaws and refused to go anywhere near the beach for six months. My first trip to the cinema to see The Little Mermaid and instantly falling in love with Disney animation. The moment I discovered Mary Poppins and found my childhood (and […]

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The Sentimental Melodrama of ’83: Terms Of Endearment Review

Narratively, Terms Of Endearment leaves a lot to be desired in terms of interesting characters or dynamic storytelling. This is a very slow, deliberate, and melodramatic look at the struggles of a married mother of three who never seems to catch a break and is constantly struggling to get a grasp on life.

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Heat and Dust (1983) – Gender Imbalance Spans Time & Space

Heat and Dust was Merchant/Ivory’s biggest hit to date internationally. Britain was in the throes of nostalgia for the period of Raj India – Lean’s A Passage to India was about to break on the big screen and, on TV, The Jewel in the Crown would dominate.

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L’argent: Talking Money

Narration is simple explanation to tell the story. Cinematic language shows that there are many different ways to explain scenes, and create a variety of approaches for the audience. Robert Bresson was one of the most important narrators to shape mise-en-scene for showing impulse. The actions of people, and the background information, create some of […]

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The Year of Living Dangerously (1983)

Hot off the success of his now-classic anti-war epic, Peter Weir took on the adaptation of Christopher Koch’s potboiler about a collision between romance, journalistic obligation and revolution, The Year of Living Dangerously, which would become his last purely Australian effort.

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First Reactions: Suspiria

We open with the chilling score which immediately unsettles us, the music is high-pitched, eerie and disturbing, like a wailing wind. The medium shot of Dakota Johnson clasping her hand over her heart, wearing a pained expression only heightens the feeling of unease. She takes a deep breath, and the camera zooms in tighter on […]

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