1975 Review: Death Race 2000

Death Race 2000 is one of those films that’s eluded me my whole life. I remember seeing a poster for it about a decade back in a burrito shop that decorated with retro timepieces. It’s tagline, “In the year 2000, hit and run driving is no longer a crime. It’s the NATIONAL SPORT!” glares out […]

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The Enduring Legacy of The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Every filmmaker hopes their piece of work will go on to become a classic. A film which people watch and discuss for decades to come. Majority of the time, this obviously doesn’t occur. Many films fade from consciousness the minute the credits roll, particularly when they fail at the box office. But every so often, […]

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Watch Your Back – Three Days Of The Condor Review

Robert Redford plays a CIA researcher who is sent on the run when he discovers his six coworkers dead, in Sydney Pollock’s 1975 paranoid thriller Three Days Of The Condor. Pollock creates an atmospheric New York setting, beautifully utilizing the city’s most notable landmarks, and frames the city as an imposing backdrop. Another notable aspect […]

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Skammen: Ingmar Bergman Invades Us With A New Depth of Shame

The sounds of war accompany the opening title of Ingmar Bergman’s 1968 film Skammen (Shame). A tad unfamiliar to many Bergman regulars. Following the recent birth of Persona and the upcoming The Hour of the Wolf, this is evidently ample departure from the intimate melancholy, conflict with God, and the questionable status of one’s faith. We also […]

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The Bank Robbery As Circus – Dog Day Afternoon Review

Al Pacino garnered his fourth consecutive Best Acting Oscar nomination in 1975 for his performance as Sonny in Dog Day Afternoon. Sonny, along with his partner, Sal (John Cazale), start the film off by botching a bank robbery in Brooklyn. When they find all the money in the safe has already been picked up, and […]

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François Truffaut and Isabelle Adjani: Two of Cinema’s Finest Recall L’Histoire d’Adèle H.

It may be neither here nor there as to how French filmmaking great, François Truffaut, shadowed some strong affections for the brash, bright actress, Isabelle Adjani, during the making of L’Histoire d’Adèle H. (The Story of Adèle H.). The world and backstory of cinema has numerous tales of involvement / admiration / alleged romance between those […]

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With the Sins and the Redemption Comes The Virgin Spring

For 1960, The Virgin Spring is a real shape-shifter for the audiences back then fidgeting in their seats at such extraordinary, shocking story-telling. In fact, Ingmar Bergman’s incredible film would have gasps and quivers from today’s audience. A film that is at once beautiful and serene, where innocence is punctured, fundamentals of faith are broken, […]

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The Pitfalls Of Excess – Shampoo Review

Hal Ashby followed up his successful run of early 70’s cinematic triumphs trifecta of The Landlord, Harold & Maude, and The Last Detail with 1975’s sexual and political satire Shampoo. Starring Warren Beatty as a Lothario hairdresser named George, who finds himself juggling three women at once surrounding a 24 hour period during the 1968 […]

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Kubrick’s Picturesque Vision: Barry Lyndon Review

1975 marked an incredible year for American film with an embarrassment of riches throughout the industry. One Flew Over The Cukoo’s Nest, Dog Day Afternoon, Shampoo, Jaws, and Nashville just to name a few of the titles. Largely forgotten despite it’s four Oscar wins is Stanley Kubrick’s breathtaking masterpiece Barry Lyndon. Starring Ryan O’Neal as […]

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2018 First-Half Favorites: Annihilation

When asked about my favorite movies from the first half of 2018, there’s one film that remains head and shoulders above any other new release I’ve seen this year. This film shook me so much upon my first watch that I went back to watch it again in the theater that very same day. I […]

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Laura Gets a Cat

Next month I am going to be 29, *gulps* and I often feel that I haven’t really done much with my life, I am not a home owner, I’m not married with children and at this point in time I don’t even own a car! I’m not alone, there are many millennial’s out there who […]

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Searching for Whitney: Kevin Mcdonald’s New Documentary Whitney

Whitney Houston was an icon, a film star, a pop legend, a woman who overcame the odds to rise to the top of stardom. But behind that dazzling smile she was a broken, fragile soul who was always performing as someone else for the world, and never fully embracing who she truly was. Whitney’s life […]

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Hope and Despair: Paul Schrader’s First Reformed

First Reformed is a film that has been fifty years in the making. Going all the way back to the start of director Paul Schrader’s film criticism career. He wrote a book on spiritual cinema called Transcendental Style In Film that covers the work of Yasujiro Ozu, Robert Bresson, and Carl Dreyer. Schrader had not […]

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Altman’s Perfect Farewell Companion

Completed just one year before his passing, the tale of the last days of a long-running public radio show seems rather ironic fodder for Robert Altman’s final film. Originally titled The Last Show, the ailing Altman clearly knew this would very likely be his last contribution to the world of cinema, perhaps wanting A Prairie Home Companion to […]

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People Review

People is an independent film written and directed by Shane McGoey involving six character vignettes that are woven together, attempting to tell a larger story. It’s a filmmaker’s film and a director’s film, and a movie that celebrates closely focused and dialogue-heavy scenes. It’s heady, in an introspective way, attempting to dissect its characters’ motives […]

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Passing the Time: Review of A Prairie Home Companion

Altman handles all the various parts with masterful care. This film is never boring, and it very well could be. The lack of a cohesive storyline could wear out its welcome fast, but Altman infuses each scene with enough flair to keep your attention. And the performances hold you there.

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Testament (1983) – When the Worst Happens

The secret to Littman’s film is that there is no proselytizing. We don’t see the bomb explode; we don’t know the political circumstances or which megalomaniac (elected or dictator) started the deluge. We only see things from the point of view of the innocent who pay for the folly with their lives.

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Take My Breath Away: In Defence of 1983’s Breathless

Breathless looks music-video slick and drips with style, creating the sense of a heightened reality set on the streets of L.A. This is the nouvelle vague for the MTV generation. The story and characters in both films may seem similar, but to call the 1983 Breathless a remake is a naive assumption.

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Violence Solves Nothing – Bad Boys (1983) Review

Bad Boys is that life lesson that truly reaches out from the streets of Chicago to illuminate our understanding of humanity through the eyes of teenagers who don’t understand the weight of their actions.

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The Sentimental Melodrama of ’83: Terms Of Endearment Review

Narratively, Terms Of Endearment leaves a lot to be desired in terms of interesting characters or dynamic storytelling. This is a very slow, deliberate, and melodramatic look at the struggles of a married mother of three who never seems to catch a break and is constantly struggling to get a grasp on life.

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