Review: Kristen Stewart’s Directorial Debut Short ‘Come Swim’

Death is not the greatest loss in life. The greatest loss is what dies inside us while we live. — Norman Cousins Many of us have a fear of the water, there is something unnerving about what lurks beneath us and the threat of being pulled under. Kristen Stewart’s (yes, that Kristen Stewart from Twilight) […]

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Review: The Florida Project

“Childhood means simplicity. Look at the world with the child’s eye – it is very beautiful.” Kailash Satyarthi In Sean Baker’s excellent The Florida Project we see the glorious, almost technicolor world through the eyes of six year old Moonee (Brooklynn Prince), who is living below the poverty line in post-election America. However, she doesn’t see […]

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Review: Call Me By Your Name

A review by Bianca Garner “Nature has cunning ways of finding our weakest spot.” These words are profound and they sum up the power of love, it makes us weak in ways we never thought possible, but this same weakness can make an individual stronger. Call Me By Your Name addresses the complexities of a […]

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Independent Filmmaker Arthur Egeli Reconstructs A ‘Murder On The Cape’

I knew a little about the true story of Christa Worthington, a fashion writer who was involved in a coastal affair, before being brutally murdered. When I sat down to watch Arthur Egeli‘s film based on those events, Murder on the Cape, I went looking into it even further. The screenplay from Egeli has a […]

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Rat Film Is Perhaps The Most Arresting Documentary Of The Century

At last, it’s what we’ve been asking for: a documentary about Baltimore’s storied rat infestation. What if a documentary compared the lives of rats to the lives of human beings? It is the prompt for a problematic, think-piece-generating film sure to divide viewers on the socio-political spectrum. And that’s what director Theo Anthony gets at in […]

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Warehoused: The Documentary Film Takes Us To The Refugee Camps Of Kenya

With the candid, provoking feature-length documentary Warehoused, from Life Is My Movie Entertainment, I was not only reminded of the power of the non-fiction genre, but once again lucky enough to gain further insight into parts of the world we still somehow take for granted. Directed by Vincent Vittorio and Asher Emmanuel, Warehoused gets straight […]

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WANTED: Unpaid But Passionate Film Writers

I guess by now most of you are aware of the new name and layout of the site. A site that has been running since 2014, striving to shine bright lights across the alternative corners of the film world. And of course I want to keep building on that, this site really must greater than […]

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Darren Aronofsky’s Mother! Proves To Polarize With Its Ambiguity

So many things to say about Darren Aronofsky’s new film, Mother!. First, I want to express that I really liked it. It’s scary, intense, emotional, frenetic, and ambiguous, which I think might be its greatest strength. For most of the film, it has rising and falling tension, but never becomes more than what the average […]

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‘I’m Not Ashamed’ Review: Pandering For Jesus (And Columbine)

On April 20, 1999, two high school seniors, Eric Harris and Dyland Klebold, opened fire on the grounds of Columbine High School, killing twelve students and one teacher, in addition to injuring twenty-one students as a few tried to escape the chaos happening in real-time, before they turned the gun on themselves. The attack is […]

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Maren Ade’s Latest Film Toni Erdmann Is Both Long And Alluring

When the movie Toni Erdmann entered our lives last May we assumed without agenda this was about a father’s relationship with his (grown-up) daughter. Which it kind of is, but more than that it turns out to be about a daughter, and her relationship with her (juvenile) father. This is not exactly a devastating plot […]

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Watch: Saranne Bensusan’s 12 Minute Short Film Mano a Mono

Roughly twenty years is probably enough time for most audience members, if not this particular critic, to forget one of the most famous twists in movie history, especially when they only have to forget it for roughly ten minutes of a new film’s 12-minute running time. It is also true that Saranne Bensusan’s short film […]

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NZIFF: Christchurch Closes Its Film Festival Curtain

The curtain has fallen on NZIFF’s Christchurch leg for 2017, and it has been a remarkable Festival. Every year, NZIFF goes above and beyond to provide cinephiles with the best New Zealand and the world has to offer cinematically. Better yet, the Festival is not just in a single location, but across New Zealand, with […]

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NZIFF Review: The Square

After a satisfyingly diverse NZIFF for 2017, all eyes were on the Closing Night film, Ruben Östlund’s Palme d’Or winning satire The Square. Not only is the film wholly deserving of its Cannes win, it was also a perfect finale for the Film Festival. The Square takes a tongue-firmly-in-cheek look at a modern art gallery […]

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NZIFF Review: The Lost City of Z

The Christchurch leg of the New Zealand International Film Festival is creeping ever closer to the final few days; but there are still magnificent films on offer until the curtain falls this coming weekend. While my chosen films have ranged from the cerebral (Stalker, The Killing of a Sacred Deer) to the heart-warming (Spookers), there […]

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NZIFF Review: 6 Days

In April 1980, armed gunmen infiltrate the Iranian Embassy in London. What followed would not only set the template for the British response to terrorist threats, but saw unprecedented live news coverage never before seen in Britain. On a Bank Holiday weekend where the most anticipated viewing on television was the snooker finals, a heart-stopping, […]

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NZIFF Review: The Killing of a Sacred Deer

  One of the benefits of film festivals like NZIFF is that cinephiles have the opportunity to sample some very different fare from what is offered on a regular basis, and if you’re looking for something to challenge you cinematically, Yorgos Lanthimos’s The Killing of a Sacred Deer absolutely fits the bill. The Killing of a Sacred Deer is […]

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Review: Julieta

Watching the world through Almodovar’s eyes through the years has always been a unfaltering honor and immeasurable pleasure; for that alone, I feel privileged. But even so, even with all the love and unashamed, favorable predisposition towards his movies, I had no clue as to how much Julieta would impress me. With the superb framing and […]

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NZIFF Review: Spookers

Confession: I didn’t expect to come out of Florian Habicht’s Spookers feeling as buoyant as I did. While the trailer for the film had utterly charmed me into making Spookers part of my NZIFF viewing this year, trailers can be deceiving. Thankfully, Spookers turned out to be a funny, engaging and life-affirming documentary experience. Spookers […]

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Indie Feature ‘She Rises’ Echoes Lynchian Nightmares

She Rises, which had its world premier at the Ireland Horrorthon Film Festival, is a mystery-comedy-horror hybrid of sorts, pulling some impressive, if ridiculously oddball, strings towards potential indie cult status. The opening shots of She Rises, with some disorientating, swaying camera movements, allows director Larry Wade Carrell, editor Vance Crofoot, and director of photography Steve […]

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NZIFF Review: Stalker

The New Zealand International Film Festival has a history of providing cinephiles not only with brilliant new films but also bringing classics back to the big screen, and this year is no different. The Christchurch leg sees the screening of the restored version of Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1979 dystopian classic, Stalker. Stalker is less of a […]

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