Review: Ben Stiller In Brad’s Status

Ben Stiller is more than capable of putting on a serious face and stop acting like a goofball, in order to show us all how he can cope under the pressures of being a serious actor. We have seen Stiller act seriously in films like Greenberg (2010) and While We’re Young (2014). Although he performed better in Greenberg […]

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For Your Consideration: I, Tonya, Best Picture

America…they want someone to love, but they want someone to hate.” All she wanted to do was be the best figure skater in America. But instead became one of the biggest punchlines of the 90s. It doesn’t matter that she was the first woman ever to perform a triple axel during an international event, because […]

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Matt St.Clair’s Top 10 Films Of 2017

Now that 2017 has come to a close, it is time to reflect on the best that the year in cinema had to offer. And it has been quite a year. 2017 was a rich year for diversity in terms of not just the stories being told, but also the people that have made them. Female directors […]

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Watch Horror Short ‘The Disappearance of Willie Bingham’

In recent years the amount of psychological horror and minimal science fiction films is increasing, and this ongoing change is definitely a good one. “The Disappearance of Willie Bingham” is not a pure horror, though – at least, if you do not consider the creepiest “Black Mirror” episodes as horror, but the radical justice system […]

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Star Wars: The Last Jedi Might Be Too Big

The release of a new Star Wars film has always been a huge event. It has become something that is hyped about up to a year before it’s release usually around Christmas time. So Santa can make sure to bring all the good little Jedi boys and girls the latest action figures and cute stuffed […]

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Fight or Flight? The Tale Of Two Lovers In Spielberg’s The Terminal

I don’t do romantic comedies, I find them predictable and cliched. But I do like Tom Hanks, because well he’s Tom Hanks. And, I adore Steven Spielberg because well he’s Steven Spielberg. So in theory I should enjoy The Terminal (2004). My boyfriend recommended it, saying “It’s really good.” but he has terrible taste in […]

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Indiana Jones and His Greatest Hits

I came across the exploits of Indiana Jones in 2008 in the form of the fourth installment of the series, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. I was 18 at the time, and decided that I could pay $7.50 for a movie ticket, another 15 dollars on a medium-size popcorn and soda cup, […]

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Indiana Jones and the Return to Form

I’ll be honest: after Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, I was wary about watching the third outing, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. I wasn’t sure how this seemly final chapter of the legend of Dr. Jones would end, nor did I think I would care. Imagine my surprise to learn that the third outing […]

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Let’s Talk About Catch Me If You Can

Whenever people talk about the historical prestige films that Steven Spielberg has made over the years, they talk about films like Schindler’s List, The Color Purple, and Lincoln. But sadly, it seems that nobody really talks about Catch Me If You Can. Even though it was nominated for two Oscars, Supporting Actor for Christopher Walken and Original Score for John Williams, and […]

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Review: Justice League

We’ve been waiting for this film ever since Tim Burton’s Batman appeared on our screens back in 1989 (my birth year), and it’s taken nearly 28 years to see the Justice League on the big screen. The question on everyone’s mind is whether or not Justice League can live up to the hype. Well, may […]

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Review: Dee Rees’ Essential Mudbound

Mudbound is many things at once: A demonstration of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, a portrait of racial tensions in rural America, and a universal telling of everyday people trying to live through the trials of today to build a better tomorrow. Yet the film is one thing as well: Poetic. Despite its heavy subject matter, it […]

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Review: Kristen Stewart’s Directorial Debut Short ‘Come Swim’

Death is not the greatest loss in life. The greatest loss is what dies inside us while we live. — Norman Cousins Many of us have a fear of the water, there is something unnerving about what lurks beneath us and the threat of being pulled under. Kristen Stewart’s (yes, that Kristen Stewart from Twilight) […]

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Review: The Florida Project

“Childhood means simplicity. Look at the world with the child’s eye – it is very beautiful.” Kailash Satyarthi In Sean Baker’s excellent The Florida Project we see the glorious, almost technicolor world through the eyes of six year old Moonee (Brooklynn Prince), who is living below the poverty line in post-election America. However, she doesn’t see […]

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Review: Call Me By Your Name

A review by Bianca Garner “Nature has cunning ways of finding our weakest spot.” These words are profound and they sum up the power of love, it makes us weak in ways we never thought possible, but this same weakness can make an individual stronger. Call Me By Your Name addresses the complexities of a […]

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Independent Filmmaker Arthur Egeli Reconstructs A ‘Murder On The Cape’

I knew a little about the true story of Christa Worthington, a fashion writer who was involved in a coastal affair, before being brutally murdered. When I sat down to watch Arthur Egeli‘s film based on those events, Murder on the Cape, I went looking into it even further. The screenplay from Egeli has a […]

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Rat Film Is Perhaps The Most Arresting Documentary Of The Century

At last, it’s what we’ve been asking for: a documentary about Baltimore’s storied rat infestation. What if a documentary compared the lives of rats to the lives of human beings? It is the prompt for a problematic, think-piece-generating film sure to divide viewers on the socio-political spectrum. And that’s what director Theo Anthony gets at in […]

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Warehoused: The Documentary Film Takes Us To The Refugee Camps Of Kenya

With the candid, provoking feature-length documentary Warehoused, from Life Is My Movie Entertainment, I was not only reminded of the power of the non-fiction genre, but once again lucky enough to gain further insight into parts of the world we still somehow take for granted. Directed by Vincent Vittorio and Asher Emmanuel, Warehoused gets straight […]

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WANTED: Unpaid But Passionate Film Writers

I guess by now most of you are aware of the new name and layout of the site. A site that has been running since 2014, striving to shine bright lights across the alternative corners of the film world. And of course I want to keep building on that, this site really must greater than […]

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Darren Aronofsky’s Mother! Proves To Polarize With Its Ambiguity

So many things to say about Darren Aronofsky’s new film, Mother!. First, I want to express that I really liked it. It’s scary, intense, emotional, frenetic, and ambiguous, which I think might be its greatest strength. For most of the film, it has rising and falling tension, but never becomes more than what the average […]

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‘I’m Not Ashamed’ Review: Pandering For Jesus (And Columbine)

On April 20, 1999, two high school seniors, Eric Harris and Dyland Klebold, opened fire on the grounds of Columbine High School, killing twelve students and one teacher, in addition to injuring twenty-one students as a few tried to escape the chaos happening in real-time, before they turned the gun on themselves. The attack is […]

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Maren Ade’s Latest Film Toni Erdmann Is Both Long And Alluring

When the movie Toni Erdmann entered our lives last May we assumed without agenda this was about a father’s relationship with his (grown-up) daughter. Which it kind of is, but more than that it turns out to be about a daughter, and her relationship with her (juvenile) father. This is not exactly a devastating plot […]

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