Around the World in 80 Films: Diabolique

Les diaboliques, released as Diabolique in the United States, and variously translated as The Devils or The Fiends, is a chilling psychological horror that still stands up today. The story blends elements of thriller and horror, with the plot focusing on a woman and her husband’s mistress who conspire to murder the man. After the crime […]

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Around the World in 80 Films: Summer with Monika

Summer with Monika

Summer with Monika is a 1953 Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman, based on Per Anders Fogelström’s 1951 novel of the same title. It was controversial abroad at the time of its first release for its frank depiction of nudity, but due to this reputation the film was a huge success. Without a doubt, its […]

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God’s Lonely Creature: Revisiting Robin Williams’ in One Hour Photo

A picture tells a thousand words. In a world obsessed with appearances and our image, we place a lot of emphasis on the importance of a photo. One Hour Photo (2002) deals with the pursuit for the perfect image, and the need to appear important to the outside world. The film follows Sy Parrish (Robin […]

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The Receptionist

Many of us have fallen on hard times, trying to make our pennies stretch until the end of the month, worrying about how we will find the money to pay for rent. The main character Tina (played by the exceptional Teresa Daley) in The Receptionist is in dire financial straits, trying to find work but […]

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Exclusive Interview: Michael Ferrell Writer & Director of Laura Gets a Cat

If you read my previous review of Indie comedy, Laura Gets a Cat, you would know just how much I enjoyed it. When offered the opportunity to interview writer and director Michael Ferrell, I jumped at the chance. Filmotomy would like to thank Michael and Chris Prine (the producer on Laura Gets a Cat) for […]

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Around the World in 80 Films: Dogtooth

Dogtooth comes from the warped mind of Yorgos Lanthimos, who divided audiences with last years brilliantly wonderful, if not disturbing film The Killing of a Sacred Deer. Dogtooth is Lanthimos’ second feature, but is perhaps the one that garnered him the most attention. As despite its controversial subject matter, it won the Prix Un Certain […]

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Money! Money! Money! Generation Wealth Review

Just what can money buy you? Status, class, authority, respect, infamy, a presidency? The list of things you can gain with a little (or rather a lot) of green, is endless. In the Western society, money makes the world go around. However, we all know the old saying: Money can’t buy you happiness. Certainly, we […]

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Around the World in 80 Films: L’Avventura

How have I never seen L’Avventura? This was the question I found myself asking after finishing the 1960 classic film directed by Michelangelo Antonioni. As a film student I was aware of L’Avventura, and it’s impact on cinema, but I just had placed it on my ”to watch” list and had moved on with things. […]

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Not Another Dumb Blonde: Mansfield 66/67

Despite being dubbed as another dumb blonde to rival Marilyn Monroe,  Jayne Mansfield was actually a genius with very high IQ, of 163. In addition to English, she spoke four other languages. She learned French, Spanish, and German in high school, and in 1963 she studied Italian. Reputed to be Hollywood’s “smartest dumb blonde,” she […]

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Around the World in 80 Films: Au Revoir Les Enfants

For my first film on the Around the World in 80 Films event, I decided to watch Louis Malle’s autobiographical Au Revoir Les Enfants, which I have read about but have never have had the chance to watch. I am aware that director Malle based the film on his own experiences as child growing up in […]

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Bee Goes Around the World in 80 Films: Introduction

Okay, confession time. I haven’t been abroad since I was 11. In fact, my passport expired long ago, and the last holiday I went on was to a seaside town in the UK. Which was hardly what we would class as exotic. So I must admit that haven’t seen much of the world, which I […]

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Unseen – Call for Support

Here at Filmotomy we like to promote new and emerging talent, and films from female, LGBT and minority directors, the films that don’t get enough attention and need to be talked about. After speaking to the wonderful Lotus Hannon, who is the writer and director of an upcoming short film Unseen, I knew I had […]

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Let’s Dance: Review of Jean Claude Billmaier’s Nulla

According to historical records, in 1518 there was a case of dancing mania that occurred in Strasbourg, Alsace, in the Holy Roman Empire. Where approximately 400 people took to dancing for days without rest and, over the period of about one month, some of those affected collapsed, or even died of heart attack, stroke, or […]

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Shivers – Humanity Collapsing From Within

Over the years, Cronenberg’s debut film Shivers has gained the reputation for being the ‘thinking man’s horror film’. It’s a film that provided both bloody popcorn for the masses, as well as food for thought. Shivers has undergone a myriad interpretations since it’s release, with some deemed as a attack on the middle class, a […]

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East of Edie: How Grey Gardens Changed the Documentary

Once upon there was a beautiful house that represented the American dream. Inside the house, there were two beautiful, sophisticated socialites, who were part of the upper elite. People to be admired and respected. But, the years passed, and the years were unkind. Slowly, the house began to decay, with the vermin and cats overrunning […]

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Top Moments in Bergman Films

After finally coming to an end of my Bergman journey over these last 10 days or so, watching a grand total of 13 films (yes, I know there’s a lot more that I need to see, and I do promise to get around to seeing them), I have decided to pick my favourite moments. I […]

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Happy Birthday Ingmar! The 20 Greatest Bergman Films: 20 – 11

Today, Ernst Ingmar Bergman would have turned the grand old age of 100. Sadly, Bergman passed away in 2007 (in fact he died on the same day as Michelangelo Antonioni). Bergman left behind a legacy that filmmakers can only dream of, and others have yet to beat. With a record 60 film credits to his […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary- Summer Interlude

So, this is my final entry in my Bergman diary and it’s been a wonderful journey. I came into this not really convinced that I would enjoy any of Bergman’s films, but I was so very, very wrong. I have enjoyed almost every film I have watched, although there’s been a couple I have not […]

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The Day in a Life of a Woman: Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

There is nothing quite like the 1975 domestic drama Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles. A three-hour epic, that follows the life of mother, Jeanne (Delphine Seyrig), as she goes about her day completing mundane tasks – such as peeling potatoes, and washing up. But as the film develops, the mundane slips away and […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary- Winter Light

We have all had times where we’ve questioned our faith, whether it’s faith in the terms of a religious sense, or faith in humanity. Bergman was very interested in exploring the lives of characters who dealt with an existential crisis, and used the medium of film to explore his own relationship with his faith, religious […]

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