Midnight Special: How Midnight Cowboy Changed Cinema Forever

Whatever you hear about Midnight Cowboy is true. Official tagline for Midnight Cowboy Writers’ Note: This article does feature some language which some may find offensive, this language is taken from quotations from interviews with the director and should be placed within historical and social context. This is not language that I am comfortable using […]

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Beyond the Videodrome: A Celebration of James Woods’ Work

James Woods

If I say I’m the best actor for the part, I mean it and I’m not kidding. James Woods Love him or hate him, there’s no way to ignore actor James Woods. Famously a republican (although he has stressed that he’s not a hard core conservative although check out his Twitter account and be your […]

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Why Rooney Mara’s Pie Eating Scene Defines A Ghost Story

Rooney Mara

David Lowery’s A Ghost Story was one of 2017’s most divisive films, but there is no denying the power of Rooney Mara’s performance. As it is her birthday today, I have chosen to revisit the film’s most infamous scene. This scene is a total of nearly five minutes long and is a simple one shot, with no editing […]

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Exclusive Interview with Director James Atkins

James Atkins

We here at Filmotomy love supporting indie filmmakers, and we were giving the exclusive opportunity to speak to film director, James Atkins, about his highly amusing short film Bragging Rights. The short film follows three superheroes who happen to be roomies, and get into a bragging match about who has done the most heroic deed, which get more […]

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Cinema’s Mozart: Remembering Milos Forman

“Humour was not important just for me, humour was important for this nation for centuries, to survive.” Today the world woke to some tragic news, the great Czech film director, screenwriter, actor, and professor, Milos Forman had passed away at the age of 86. The Oscar winner came to the United States in  the late […]

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Trapped in the Rat Race: Revisiting Lynne Ramsay’s Ratcatcher

With the recent release of You Were Never Really Here, and the Rewind year at Filmotomy, it seems only fitting to revisit Lynne Ramsay’s debut film which came out in the glorious year of film, 1999. Ratcatcher was screened in the Un Certain Regard section at the 1999 Cannes Film Festival and won its director […]

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Life Interrupted: The Journey to get The Virgin Suicides from Page to Screen

“I never thought I would be a film-maker. It wasn’t something I ever planned. I had so many interests but I just couldn’t find one medium that really clicked for me. Then I made a short film, Lick the Star in 1998, and it brought together all the things I loved.” Sofia Coppola, The Guardian It seems […]

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Short Film Review: Not(e) for a Dreamer

Whilst watching Not(e) for a Dreamer I was reminded of a certain quote, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “ Youth comes but once in a lifetime.” Indeed being young is something we only experience once, an in the grand scale of things it is only a fleeting passing moment that is over all too quick, just like summer. This […]

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The Woman of your Nightmares: Is Audition about Misogyny or is about Misandry?

“A truly shocking horror film about obsession gone evil, “Audition” is made even more disturbing by its haunting beauty.” Ken Eisner, Variety Miike Takashi is a director who doesn’t shy away from showing us the ugly aspect to life, and he certainly knows what audiences are traumatized by, but his 1999 film Audition is perhaps his most shocking […]

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Documentary Review – SHOT! The Psycho-Spiritual Mantra of Rock

With a name like Mick Rock, you would have been more surprised if he hadn’t pursued a life of Rock N’ Roll. SHOT! Is an odyssey into the history of rock ‘n’ roll via the photographs and recounts of rock’s greatest living photographer: Mick Rock who navigates his story from the glam rock shimmer of London to the […]

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Questioning Reality: Revisiting The Thirteenth Floor

Ignorance is bliss. For the first time in my life, I agree. Hannon Fuller (Armin Mueller-Stahl) 1999 saw the science fiction genre be redefined by the likes of The Matrix. But there was another (frankly far more superior) science fiction film which was released during that year which also dealt with the similar concept of […]

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“Tell Him I’m Coming.” Revisiting the Explosive Revenge Neo-Noir The Limey

“Bide your time. That’s what prison teaches you, if nothing else. Bide your time, and everything becomes clear, and you can act accordingly.” When Steven Soderbergh’s The Limey exploded onto the big screen in 1999, it wasn’t quite what audiences were expecting. This isn’t a big budget action flick, with explosions or prolonged material arts […]

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Documentary Review – David Lynch: The Art Life

David Lynch is a larger than life film director and artist who has over the years brought us such surreal delights as Eraserhead (1977), Twin Peaks (1991 and 2017) and Mulholland Drive (2001). What is perhaps a more surreal story than anything feature in his work, is his own story and the development of his career. Directors Jon […]

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Documentary Review – The Karma Killings

India and the rest of the world were left shaken in 2006, when a pair of serial killers were caught after killing 19 children, what made the whole situation even more shocking was that one of the serial killers was a local business man Moninder Singh Pandher who was regarded as a pillar of society. This documentary tries […]

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Documentary Review – Mommy Dead and Dearest

A mother is supposed to take care of their child through any sickness, and on the surface this seemed to be the case with mother Dee Dee and her daughter Gypsy Rose Blanchard. But it’s as Sheriff Arnott says during the film, “Things are not always as they appear.” And in June 2015, the police arrived at the […]

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Documentary Review – Dawson City: Frozen Time

There’s a high chance that you haven’t heard of Dawson City, a small town in Yukon, Canada, with a population of 1,375, but for a brief time it was the city that represented the “American dream”, a town where you could finally make it. It’s a place that has always been inhabited, in prehistoric times the area was […]

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Review: The Night I Swam

Children have a habit of getting into mischief, and certainly the child protagonist of Takara, la nuit où j’ai nagé (The Night I Swam) is a mischievous character who is one of those children you have to watch like a hawk. The film is a collaboration by two directors, one is a French director (Damien Manivel, the director […]

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The Angel of Death: Revisiting Martin Scorsese’s Bringing Out The Dead

There’s always been something about the loner that Martin Scorsese keeps returning to throughout his work; the individual who is on the fringes of the society he inhabits, the outsider who doesn’t belong, and he may seem crazy but perhaps he might well be the only sane person there. Like Travis Bickle who came before […]

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Short Film Review: Mrs. Poucheau

At some point in our lives, we will inevitably experience the loss of a loved one. It’s a sad and bitter truth of human life, and we will all experience grief in different ways. The subject of Amanda Lago’s new short, Mrs. Poucheau is about an individual’s experience with loss and grief and addresses our […]

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Marty’s Overambitious Disaster: Why Did New York, New York Flop?

It was a struggle trying to track down a copy of Martin Scorsese’s New York, New York, I couldn’t find it on Amazon Prime, or ITunes and in the end I purchased a second-hand DVD. The cover features Robert De Niro and Liza Minnelli walking down a sidewalk in the nighttime, it looked like a still from Scorsese’s […]

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Alice in Wanderland: Why Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore is More Than Just a “Woman’s Picture.”

Despite having an impressive filmography Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore (1974) remains Martin Scorsese’s first and only film starring a female protagonist, but regardless of the gender of its central character, it is very much a story about finding one’s identity in the chaotic world and the evolution of relationships between certain individuals. It is a film that is […]

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