Review: Miss Stevens

Whether the flourishing Netflix platform for feature films has garnered a straight-to-video feel may be a matter of opinion, but a notion that warrants much more prestige when you compare the accessibility and quality of the digital age over the videotape culture of the 1980s. Regardless, there would be little reason not to venture off […]

Read More

Review: Frantz

The Good: Strong, unyielding performances were to be enjoyed by all – especially the ladies, and even more particular, Cyrielle Claire who graces our screens for mere minutes but still manages to demand our admiration all the same. The cinematography, in parts, is tremendous, with beautiful, natural backdrops and framing worthy of a master. The […]

Read More

Review: Suntan

Argyris Papadimitropoulos is an okay director, nothing spectacular, we knew that already. Makis Papadimitriou already proved himself in the recent Chevalier so I wasn’t too worried about him. Elli Trigkou, a newcomer, an a priori 50-50 of potential. The subject matter well-overused; a man confronted by his own fleeting youth and crushing loneliness falls ridiculously […]

Read More

Review: Divines

Audiences around the world are missing out on the non-commercial, non-English language film gems – it has been the same for years, decades. French film Divines (di-veen) is one such motion picture, an experience that made me actually feel something far deeper than surface emotions. Directed by breakthrough Houda Benyamina, winning the Caméra d’Or at the Cannes Film […]

Read More

Review: The Hollars

I could nitpick and find a trillion faults with this movie. The direction lacks any sort of inspiration, letting the viewer actually “feel” the passive way Krasinski chooses to go about treating the all-star cast. Thankfully, most of the actors seem to know what they’re doing so, albeit lukewarm directorially, the performances somewhat save the day. […]

Read More

Review: The Salesman

Without it yet being an actual problem, watching this felt like Asghar Farhadi has become a bit too self-aware, dangerously close to falling into the black hole of his own creativity. A tad too stylized, a lashing too structured, The Salesman is still a profoundly personal movie, anthropocentric to almost a fault without ever crossing […]

Read More

Psychology Of Film Diagnosis: Three Colors Blue

Blue, the first in Krzysztof Kieślowski’s Three Colors trilogy, tells the story of a ghost musician, Julie, who is caught in a grieving cycle after her husband and daughter pass away in a car accident. Unable to cut herself out of existence through a failed suicide attempt upon hearing about their deaths, Julie tries the […]

Read More

LACMA Review: Personal Shopper

In their second collaboration, Kristen Stewart and director Olivier Assayas go down a creepy American in Paris Gothic film road with Personal Shopper. I was in attendance Monday night at the Film Independent at LACMA screening where after wards, there was a Q&A. Kristen stars as Maureen, a young woman who is still mourning the […]

Read More

Review And Q&A: Personal Shopper

Personal Shopper is an emotional story about loss, luxury labels, comfy pullovers, ghosts, scooters, ectoplasm, and contacting the other side. Something for everyone, en fait. Personal shopper is the second collaboration between the French auteur director Olivier Assayas and his Southlands ingénue, Kristen Stewart, who scooped the first ever Cesar to go to an American […]

Read More

Review: I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore

You might recognize Macon Blair from Gold, Green Room, and as the lead in Blue Ruin, but with this new Netflix release, I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore, we now get to experience (and cherish) him turning an assured hand at writing and directing a feature film. Tipping over the edge of […]

Read More

Review: Passengers

Morten Tyldum decided that after making the pulsating, brilliant Headhunters in his native Norway that he would downgrade, flying off to make the English-language The Imitation Game. After that was over-lavished with Academy Award nominations, he got the opportunity to direct a big budget sci-fi movie with none other than Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence. Sounds […]

Read More

Review: Incarcerating US

Getting to sit both sides of the high fence is a real viewers’ privilege when it comes down to documentaries depicting the parts of the world we certainly know of, but have never stepped foot in. Not the case for all, sure, but as an Englishman with little personal interest in criminology, or indeed experience […]

Read More

Review: The Witch / Under the Shadow

The problem with horror films is that there are not enough horror films. Let me rephrase, the problem with horror films is that there are not enough good ones. Great ones. That might not be an issue for you, but I love a good scare. A high level of intrigue. Being startled, wondering whats behind […]

Read More

Review: One Day in April

One Day in April sets off as it means to go on, a steady pedal towards a chunk of local glory in Indiana, often dashing on ahead, leaving us back here in the crowd watching, somehow exhilarated and euphoric. When documentaries cross over into the engaging channel of your blood stream, as well as this […]

Read More

Review: Loving

Companionship derived through pure love is tough at the best of times, but for the likes of Richard and Mildred Loving their struggles were not through their own devotion to each other, but rather the inter-racial marriage laws in certain parts of America in the 1950s. Still somehow relevant today, the notion that two people […]

Read More

Review: The Wailing

Forget about what you expect going into Na Hong-jin’s extraordinary The Wailing, a shape-shifter of a film, part detective story, part mystery, part thriller, part horror, part God only knows what. South Korean cinema gets a fairly bright pin on the map of international movies of 2016, The Wailing sets up the strange tale without […]

Read More

Review: Your Name

It is not always enough to say we enjoyed the motion pictures that slipped under the viewing net, because we loved them so. The wife spoke passionately about this recently. Far too many films go unnoticed, unseen, which means both the industry and the audiences are missing out. Landing a very limited run in Los […]

Read More

Review: Allied

Headed by two beloved acting forces Marion Cotillard and Brad Pitt, with a well-established film-maker of the last 30 years Robert Zemeckis, a critically acclaimed screenwriter Steven Knight, a household-name score composer Alan Silvestri, and a narrative set amidst war, politics, romance, intrigue, humor – seen that kind of fodder before, sure, but we always […]

Read More

Review: Split

Here I am, about to disagree with the popular view again. Watching this did not make me think Shyamalan is “back”, or has vastly improved or something along those lines. If anything, it all strikes me as a tad ‘samey’. Even on the back of good cinematography, the movie itself suffers from atmospheric deprivation, ill-timed […]

Read More

Review: Hunt for the Wilderpeople

It starts off great; clever writing, beautiful cinematography, likable characters, witty, off-beat humour. It strongly reminded me of a more adult, ‘WesAndersony’ version of Pixar’s UP which, given the fact that film ranks so high in my mind, is definitely not a bad thing. This movie looked stunning, it had things to say and I […]

Read More