The Coen Bros. 1940’s Writer’s Block Odyssey: Barton Fink Review

Barton Fink centers around playwright and aspiring Hollywood screenwriter of same name who finds the transition a harrowing, odd, and anxiety inducing descent into madness. Fink, played by veteran acting great John Turturro, is a nervous and sensitive Jewish artist looking to expand on his broadway success. And make some money while he’s at it. […]

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Vote: Ranking The Films of Joel and Ethan Coen

At Filmotomy the next directors we are eager to cross paths with are the Coen Brothers, Ethan and Joel. The 10 Days of the Coen Brothers run from Sunday 20th May (straight after the Cannes Film Festival closes) through to Tuesday 29th May. Reviews, insights, technical analysis, basically some thrilling coverage. And of course we’re […]

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Filmotomy Exclusive Interview: Jillian Clare the Director of ‘To The Beat.’

Here at Filmotomy we were given the exclusive opportunity to view To The Beat, a highly enjoyable, teen dance flick that will leave you with a smile on your face. To The Beat was directed by Jillian Clare, an actress has appeared on both the big and small screen in numerous projects including her double […]

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Edgar Wright’s Guide To Opening a Movie

Edgar Wright

Edgar Wright is nothing if not entertaining. His kinetic style of filmmaking often reflects not only the action sequences, but also the almost wholesome depiction of the everyday characters. People like you or me. Folk we know. Granted, his plot lines involve bank robberies, aliens, zombies, super villains, cults – but in each one is […]

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Exclusive Interview with Director James Atkins

James Atkins

We here at Filmotomy love supporting indie filmmakers, and we were giving the exclusive opportunity to speak to film director, James Atkins, about his highly amusing short film Bragging Rights. The short film follows three superheroes who happen to be roomies, and get into a bragging match about who has done the most heroic deed, which get more […]

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Masterpiece: Milos Forman’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

Milos Forman

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest opens and closes with a tranquil setting, open land at near-dark, mountains, that stirring Jack Nitzsche score – emotively both experiences are very different. The brave, sensitive subject matter on show here is still tricky to handle, even today (over forty years on), but the director Milos Forman just […]

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Cinema’s Mozart: Remembering Milos Forman

“Humour was not important just for me, humour was important for this nation for centuries, to survive.” Today the world woke to some tragic news, the great Czech film director, screenwriter, actor, and professor, Milos Forman had passed away at the age of 86. The Oscar winner came to the United States in  the late […]

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Documentary Review – David Lynch: The Art Life

David Lynch is a larger than life film director and artist who has over the years brought us such surreal delights as Eraserhead (1977), Twin Peaks (1991 and 2017) and Mulholland Drive (2001). What is perhaps a more surreal story than anything feature in his work, is his own story and the development of his career. Directors Jon […]

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Martin Scorsese: Ranking His Feature Films

Let’s get on with the Scorsese business in hand. The votes are in, the poll is now closed. Here we will now run down the 20 highest ranked films of Martin Scorsese as chosen by all of you. Before we kick into that spectacular 20, we have to shout out to those that did not […]

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The Alienated Majesty of Travis Bickle – Taxi Driver Review

Screenwriter Paul Schrader’s first creation was a collaboration with Martin Scorsese called Taxi Driver. He came up with the idea when he was going through something of a nervous breakdown and full on personal crisis. He imagined a kid trapped in a Taxi Cab floating through a sewer, getting madder and madder playing with a […]

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Casino: Same Old Song & Dance?

Casino

In the hands of almost any other filmmaker, Casino would be a considered a watermark in that person’s career. Critics and film nuts (such as the very fine folks here at Filmotomy) would still be talking about the fantastic performances of Robert De Niro & Joe Pesci, two wiseguys hired by the midwest mafia to run […]

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King For A Night – The King of Comedy Review

Rupert Pupkin (Robert DeNiro) is obsessed with fame and more directly with his celebrity idol Jerry Langford. Langford is seemingly a fictitious replacement for the real king of late night in America at the time, Johnny Carson. He’s a big star and he’s played by real life comedian and comic actor Jerry Lewis. These are […]

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No One Stays At The Top Forever – Casino Review

There’s a heartfelt and thoughtful monologue heard in voice over by one of Casino’s main characters and protagonist Sam “Ace” Rothstein at the beginning of the film. When you love someone, you’ve gotta trust them. There’s no other way. You’ve got to give them the key to everything that’s yours. Otherwise, what’s the point? And […]

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The Angel of Death: Revisiting Martin Scorsese’s Bringing Out The Dead

There’s always been something about the loner that Martin Scorsese keeps returning to throughout his work; the individual who is on the fringes of the society he inhabits, the outsider who doesn’t belong, and he may seem crazy but perhaps he might well be the only sane person there. Like Travis Bickle who came before […]

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Filmotomy Podcast Episode 20: The Martin Scorsese Epic

Podcast

There’s little silence in this 3 hour Martin Scorsese epic podcast. But hang in there, it’ll be worth it. Yes, we’re talkin’ to you. Coinciding with the extraordinary 10 Days of Martin Scorsese coverage over at Filmotomy, we discuss the many wonders, moments of genius, great scenes, unforgettable dialogue, and the whole unmatchable legacy of […]

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Scorsese and the Oscars: So Many People Have Been Wishing This For Me (2004 – 2016)

Following the complete shutout for The Gangs of New York two years prior there may have been a touch of Academy guilt attached to the potential lavishing of Martin Scorsese’s latest venture – The Aviator. Add to that, of course, the fact this phenomenal film director had yet to receive a single Academy Award for directing. […]

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To Live As A Monster or Die As A Good Man – Shutter Island Review

From the very start of the opening credits we’re introduced to the insistent and recurring score that haunts the 138 minute run time of Martin Scorsese’s Shutter Island. The choppy North Atlantic waters are too rough for Marshall Teddy Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) when we first meet him, head thrust into a toilet bowl aboard a ferry […]

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Scorsese and the Oscars: Actors’ Wins, For and Against (1973 – 1991)

Heading into the 1973 Oscars, up-and-coming actor Robert De Niro was hotly fancied for a Best Supporting Actor nomination. And he had two very good chances, one with John Hancock’s baseball drama Bang the Drum Slowly, and another in a small New York picture called Mean Streets – directed by Martin Scorsese. Come nominations morning […]

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Masterpiece Memo: Raging Bull

When the opening credits begin in Raging Bull and we see a distant, hooded figure in the smoke-filled ring in warm-up sparring mode – presented in cosmic slow motion and set to the celestial “Intermezzo” from Cavalleria rusticana and the pop of flashbulbs – we sense that we are entering untrod territory.

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Marty’s Overambitious Disaster: Why Did New York, New York Flop?

It was a struggle trying to track down a copy of Martin Scorsese’s New York, New York, I couldn’t find it on Amazon Prime, or ITunes and in the end I purchased a second-hand DVD. The cover features Robert De Niro and Liza Minnelli walking down a sidewalk in the nighttime, it looked like a still from Scorsese’s […]

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