The 20 Greatest Ingmar Bergman Films: The Top 5

There’s a tear in my eye as we lose what has been a phenomenal month covering the marvelous works of Ingmar Bergman. Who am I kidding? I’ve been sobbing for three days. Tears of joy, too, I might add. An admiration of the experience watching his films, no matter the mood he leaves us in. […]

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The 20 Greatest Ingmar Bergman Films: 10 – 6

Into the top ten of Ingmar Bergman’s finest feature films – as voted for by you. Thanks to FilmStruck for their terrific and timely Bergman range. Stay tuned for the final five. 10) Sommaren med Monika / Summer with Monika (1953) WATCH ON FILMSTRUCK US WATCH ON ITUNES US WATCH ON AMAZON UK 9) Tystnaden […]

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Happy Birthday Ingmar! The 20 Greatest Bergman Films: 20 – 11

Today, Ernst Ingmar Bergman would have turned the grand old age of 100. Sadly, Bergman passed away in 2007 (in fact he died on the same day as Michelangelo Antonioni). Bergman left behind a legacy that filmmakers can only dream of, and others have yet to beat. With a record 60 film credits to his […]

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Skammen: Ingmar Bergman Invades Us With A New Depth of Shame

The sounds of war accompany the opening title of Ingmar Bergman’s 1968 film Skammen (Shame). A tad unfamiliar to many Bergman regulars. Following the recent birth of Persona and the upcoming The Hour of the Wolf, this is evidently ample departure from the intimate melancholy, conflict with God, and the questionable status of one’s faith. We also […]

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Filmotomy Podcast Episode 35: Celebrating 100 Years of Ingmar Bergman

The Ingmar Bergman podcast feels like a truly special occasion. To celebrate his centennial year, and to join the rest of the vast Bergman coverage at Filmotomy, this week’s recording is all about the great Swedish filmmaker. Host Bianca Garner, fresh off her own Bergman binge, is joined by Robin Write, and a recently acquired […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary: It Rains on Our Love

For my next entry, I decided to visit Bergman’s first directional feature It Rains on Our Love, (Det regnar på vår kärlek). The screenplay was written by Herbert Grevenius and Bergman, based on the Norwegian play Bra Mennesker (Good People). We can certainly see the Bergman we all love and admire emerging behind the camera, […]

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For the Sake of Movies: Kurosawa’s Letter to Bergman

During the research for my previous article regarding Stanley Kubrick’s fan letter to Ingmar Bergman, I came across another letter penned by a famous director, Akira Kurosawa. I thought I would discuss it in the similar fashion as I did for the Kubrick letter and share it with our readers, as I find this stuff […]

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The Stylistic Fit of Robert Altman

If one were to consider the case, it is almost interesting to consider where Robert Altman fits in the pantheon on the American cinema canon, especially in relation to modern times and looking at where his films are in those regards. A true iconoclast of the craft and profession, Altman has had a career has […]

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Doubts in the Darkness: Winter Light Review

After growing up in a conservative religious environment, I went through a period in college where I questioned aspects of my faith and went through some serious doubts. I came to the conclusion that, since my faith is the foundation of my life, it’s worth questioning. Because of that personal history, I’ve had an interesting […]

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Gosford Park: A Recipe for Excellence

The appetiser with Gosford Park is carving out an immediate set of finely-tuned, immaculately-drawn characters. Academy Award winner Julian Fellowes ought to still be held in such high praise for a screenplay so devilishly tantalising, word-for-word, that he earns that badge without a mention of Downton Abbey or that he beat Christopher Nolan’s Memento on […]

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The Great Human Drama as Mosaic: Short Cuts

Robert Altman collected one of the most diverse and talented cast of actors for his ambitious and sprawling 1993 film Short Cuts. Taking place over the course of a few days in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley, we follow well over twenty characters as they intersect with one another amid their life events. […]

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VOTE – The Greatest Films of Ingmar Bergman

On the 14th July iconic Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman would have turned 100 years-old. Sadly no longer with us, we are extremely passionate about making sure the celebrations are, above all, cinematic. Bergman was a filmmaker who more than earned his acclaim, and any excuse to honor his vast work is a welcome treat. So […]

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A Guide for Bergman Beginners

When I heard that Filmotomy would be doing an Ingmar Bergman series to commemorate what would be his 100th birthday, I could barely contain my excitement! In the last few years, I’ve gone from seeing my first Bergman film (The Seventh Seal) to now holding him up as one of my very favorite directors. I […]

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L’argent: Talking Money

Narration is simple explanation to tell the story. Cinematic language shows that there are many different ways to explain scenes, and create a variety of approaches for the audience. Robert Bresson was one of the most important narrators to shape mise-en-scene for showing impulse. The actions of people, and the background information, create some of […]

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The Dude Abides – The Big Lebowski Review

Lebowski

It all starts with the destruction of a rug that really tied the room together. Jeff “The Dude” Lebowski (Jeff Bridges) suffers a break in at his Los Angeles apartment in which his living room rug is urinated on and the rest of his place is trashed. This and the rest of the story that […]

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And It’s a Beautiful Day: Fargo Review

As a lifelong resident of the Midwest, I’ve heard many variations of “Oh, I never thought something like that would happen around here.” I grew up in Indiana farm country where we kept our doors unlocked at night. Bad things didn’t happen. In Indiana, we chalked it up to Hoosier hospitality. I’m not sure what […]

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The Coen Bros. 1940’s Writer’s Block Odyssey: Barton Fink Review

Barton Fink centers around playwright and aspiring Hollywood screenwriter of same name who finds the transition a harrowing, odd, and anxiety inducing descent into madness. Fink, played by veteran acting great John Turturro, is a nervous and sensitive Jewish artist looking to expand on his broadway success. And make some money while he’s at it. […]

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Vote: Ranking The Films of Joel and Ethan Coen

At Filmotomy the next directors we are eager to cross paths with are the Coen Brothers, Ethan and Joel. The 10 Days of the Coen Brothers run from Sunday 20th May (straight after the Cannes Film Festival closes) through to Tuesday 29th May. Reviews, insights, technical analysis, basically some thrilling coverage. And of course we’re […]

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Filmotomy Exclusive Interview: Jillian Clare the Director of ‘To The Beat.’

Here at Filmotomy we were given the exclusive opportunity to view To The Beat, a highly enjoyable, teen dance flick that will leave you with a smile on your face. To The Beat was directed by Jillian Clare, an actress has appeared on both the big and small screen in numerous projects including her double […]

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Edgar Wright’s Guide To Opening a Movie

Edgar Wright

Edgar Wright is nothing if not entertaining. His kinetic style of filmmaking often reflects not only the action sequences, but also the almost wholesome depiction of the everyday characters. People like you or me. Folk we know. Granted, his plot lines involve bank robberies, aliens, zombies, super villains, cults – but in each one is […]

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