For the Sake of Movies: Kurosawa’s Letter to Bergman

During the research for my previous article regarding Stanley Kubrick’s fan letter to Ingmar Bergman, I came across another letter penned by a famous director, Akira Kurosawa. I thought I would discuss it in the similar fashion as I did for the Kubrick letter and share it with our readers, as I find this stuff […]

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The Problem of Pain: Cries and Whispers Review

Pain is seemingly always around us. Whether it is the pain we inflict upon ourselves or pain that comes unannounced and undeserved, we have all met days where the feeling was visceral and crippling. What are we to do on those days? Why does such pain exist? Cries and Whispers is a film with a […]

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Kubrick the ‘Fan Boy’: Stanley’s Letter to Ingmar Bergman

I have written letters to writers I admire. Often I find myself squirming with embarrassment when I recall the words I wrote, (and I am still hurt that J.K.Rowling never replied). But I was so moved by their work that I just had to tell them. During my research for Filmotomy’s celebration to Ingmar Bergman, […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary – Through A Glass Darkly

The next entry for my challenge, and it really doesn’t feel like a challenge at all. I am really enjoying watching these films, which have been on my to-watch-list for so long. With so many Bergman films to pick, I decided to watch Through a Glass Darkly next, which I have been meaning to watch […]

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The Dude Abides – The Big Lebowski Review

Lebowski

It all starts with the destruction of a rug that really tied the room together. Jeff “The Dude” Lebowski (Jeff Bridges) suffers a break in at his Los Angeles apartment in which his living room rug is urinated on and the rest of his place is trashed. This and the rest of the story that […]

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And It’s a Beautiful Day: Fargo Review

As a lifelong resident of the Midwest, I’ve heard many variations of “Oh, I never thought something like that would happen around here.” I grew up in Indiana farm country where we kept our doors unlocked at night. Bad things didn’t happen. In Indiana, we chalked it up to Hoosier hospitality. I’m not sure what […]

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The Case Against the “Imaginary Donny” The Big Lebowski Fan Theory

I want you to consider a scenario with me for a moment. You want to write a movie, and you have an idea. This idea is to write a film with no coherent plot and mountains of profanity. Your main character will be an unemployed middle-aged man, and most of the movie will take place […]

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You Can’t Stop What’s Coming: No Country For Old Men Review

Winning Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Adapted Screenplay Academy Awards in 2008, No Country For Old Men solidified the careers of Joel and Ethan Coen with their best film they’d ever made. To make a statement like that, you’d have to be pretty sure of the artist’s other work. I would […]

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The Coen Bros. 1940’s Writer’s Block Odyssey: Barton Fink Review

Barton Fink centers around playwright and aspiring Hollywood screenwriter of same name who finds the transition a harrowing, odd, and anxiety inducing descent into madness. Fink, played by veteran acting great John Turturro, is a nervous and sensitive Jewish artist looking to expand on his broadway success. And make some money while he’s at it. […]

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Vote: Ranking The Films of Joel and Ethan Coen

At Filmotomy the next directors we are eager to cross paths with are the Coen Brothers, Ethan and Joel. The 10 Days of the Coen Brothers run from Sunday 20th May (straight after the Cannes Film Festival closes) through to Tuesday 29th May. Reviews, insights, technical analysis, basically some thrilling coverage. And of course we’re […]

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Masterpiece: Milos Forman’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

Milos Forman

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest opens and closes with a tranquil setting, open land at near-dark, mountains, that stirring Jack Nitzsche score – emotively both experiences are very different. The brave, sensitive subject matter on show here is still tricky to handle, even today (over forty years on), but the director Milos Forman just […]

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Cinema’s Mozart: Remembering Milos Forman

“Humour was not important just for me, humour was important for this nation for centuries, to survive.” Today the world woke to some tragic news, the great Czech film director, screenwriter, actor, and professor, Milos Forman had passed away at the age of 86. The Oscar winner came to the United States in  the late […]

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Martin Scorsese: Ranking His Feature Films

Let’s get on with the Scorsese business in hand. The votes are in, the poll is now closed. Here we will now run down the 20 highest ranked films of Martin Scorsese as chosen by all of you. Before we kick into that spectacular 20, we have to shout out to those that did not […]

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King For A Night – The King of Comedy Review

Rupert Pupkin (Robert DeNiro) is obsessed with fame and more directly with his celebrity idol Jerry Langford. Langford is seemingly a fictitious replacement for the real king of late night in America at the time, Johnny Carson. He’s a big star and he’s played by real life comedian and comic actor Jerry Lewis. These are […]

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Filmotomy Podcast Episode 20: The Martin Scorsese Epic

Podcast

There’s little silence in this 3 hour Martin Scorsese epic podcast. But hang in there, it’ll be worth it. Yes, we’re talkin’ to you. Coinciding with the extraordinary 10 Days of Martin Scorsese coverage over at Filmotomy, we discuss the many wonders, moments of genius, great scenes, unforgettable dialogue, and the whole unmatchable legacy of […]

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Scorsese and the Oscars: So Many People Have Been Wishing This For Me (2004 – 2016)

Following the complete shutout for The Gangs of New York two years prior there may have been a touch of Academy guilt attached to the potential lavishing of Martin Scorsese’s latest venture – The Aviator. Add to that, of course, the fact this phenomenal film director had yet to receive a single Academy Award for directing. […]

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To Live As A Monster or Die As A Good Man – Shutter Island Review

From the very start of the opening credits we’re introduced to the insistent and recurring score that haunts the 138 minute run time of Martin Scorsese’s Shutter Island. The choppy North Atlantic waters are too rough for Marshall Teddy Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) when we first meet him, head thrust into a toilet bowl aboard a ferry […]

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Scorsese and the Oscars: Actors’ Wins, For and Against (1973 – 1991)

Heading into the 1973 Oscars, up-and-coming actor Robert De Niro was hotly fancied for a Best Supporting Actor nomination. And he had two very good chances, one with John Hancock’s baseball drama Bang the Drum Slowly, and another in a small New York picture called Mean Streets – directed by Martin Scorsese. Come nominations morning […]

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Masterpiece Memo: Raging Bull

When the opening credits begin in Raging Bull and we see a distant, hooded figure in the smoke-filled ring in warm-up sparring mode – presented in cosmic slow motion and set to the celestial “Intermezzo” from Cavalleria rusticana and the pop of flashbulbs – we sense that we are entering untrod territory.

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Marty’s Overambitious Disaster: Why Did New York, New York Flop?

It was a struggle trying to track down a copy of Martin Scorsese’s New York, New York, I couldn’t find it on Amazon Prime, or ITunes and in the end I purchased a second-hand DVD. The cover features Robert De Niro and Liza Minnelli walking down a sidewalk in the nighttime, it looked like a still from Scorsese’s […]

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The Weight Of The Irish – Martin Scorsese’s The Departed

In the early months of 2007 Martin Scorsese’s name was called, winning for the first time in his storied career the Academy Award for Best Director. The film that he won for, The Departed, is an epic and violent saga involving the state police in Boston and the Irish gang they pursue throughout the city. […]

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