Filmotomy Podcast Episode 28: All Hail The B Movie

This week’s podcast takes a swift turn off the usual road, as the discussion heads for the elusive B movie. No, not bee, B. That gobby broad Bianca is the host, and joined by wise-guy Steve and double-crossing Rob. They dig the dirt on the movies they class as B movies, using a shovel so […]

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Cold War – Festival de Cannes In Competition Prospectus

Zimna wojna / Cold War Paweł Pawlikowski – Poland IN A NUTSHELL This is director Pawlikowski’s follow-up to the critically acclaimed Ida. Ziimma wojna is a drama spans the late 1940s to the early 1960s. We witness a passionate love story between pianist Wiktor (Tomasz Kot) and singer-dancer Zula (Joanna Kulig), who are from different […]

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Vote: Ranking The Films of Joel and Ethan Coen

At Filmotomy the next directors we are eager to cross paths with are the Coen Brothers, Ethan and Joel. The 10 Days of the Coen Brothers run from Sunday 20th May (straight after the Cannes Film Festival closes) through to Tuesday 29th May. Reviews, insights, technical analysis, basically some thrilling coverage. And of course we’re […]

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100 Explorations of World Cinema – Siedem

“You make films to give people something, to transport them somewhere else, and it doesn’t matter if you transport them to a world of intuition or a world of intellect…The realm of superstitions, fortune-telling, presentiments, intuition, dreams, all this is the inner life of a human being, and all this is the hardest thing to […]

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Citizen Welles

Orson Welles

On the 6th May, it will be Orson Welles’ 103 birthday. There’s a very high chance that you have heard the name Orson Welles, and I am going to out on a limb here and say you must be aware of his most well-known film, Citizen Kane (1941). To celebrate his birthday, I have decided […]

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100 Explorations of World Cinema – Besh

“If I had the body and the voice of an alpha male, it would be easier. It took nine years from leaving film school until Mustang was screened at Cannes, and those years were demoralising. It’s difficult not to be affected.” – – – – – Deniz Gamze Ergüven Bir Zamanlar Anadolu’da / Once Upon […]

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100 Explorations of World Cinema – Si

“When I was on The View, Barbara Walters was asking me about the blood and stuff, and I said, ‘Well, you know, that’s a staple of Japanese cinema.’ And then she came back, ‘But this is America.’ And I go, ‘I don’t make movies for America. I make movies for planet Earth.’” – – – […]

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100 Explorations of World Cinema – Tria

“The heart-wrenching musical drama unfolds as (Costas) Ferris – a respected songwriter – uses the rembetiko as a source of pride amid the chaos. The music serves as a vessel for  (Greek) cultural memory and political commentary.” – – – – – Christina Newland Ifigeneia / Iphigenia Michael Cacoyannis – Greece, 1977 On first seeing the […]

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The Visual Virtuosity of Sam Peckinpah’s Straw Dogs

The controversy surrounding Sam Peckinpah’s 1971 thriller Straw Dogs comes from a moment in the film that depicts one of the most harrowing rape scenes in cinematic history. Straw Dogs is also one of the most visually inventive, well edited, and stylistically fresh films I’ve ever seen. Peckinpah has an incredible ability to piece a […]

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Celebrate the Greatest Performances of Al Pacino

Al Pacino

While many of you voted in the poll for what you considered the greatest performances by Al Pacino, the legendary actor was heading towards his 78th birthday. A career beyond remarkable on so many exceptional levels. Picking Pacino’s finest acting moments is not an easy feat. The extraordinary range of characters, the tempo of his […]

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Midnight Special: How Midnight Cowboy Changed Cinema Forever

Whatever you hear about Midnight Cowboy is true. Official tagline for Midnight Cowboy Writers’ Note: This article does feature some language which some may find offensive, this language is taken from quotations from interviews with the director and should be placed within historical and social context. This is not language that I am comfortable using […]

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Last Tango in Paris and the Context of Memory

What started with I am Curious Yellow in the late 60s begat 1971’s challenging jamborees such as A Clockwork Orange, WR: Mysteries of the Organism, Ken Russell’s The Devils. 70s auteurs pushed the envelope without remorse – or fear. To experience Last Tango in Paris in the same context in which it first appeared is simply impossible now, but we were ready back then.

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Filmotomy Wants Film Writers *** Unpaid ***

Filmotomy now has the unwavering support of two recently appointed Deputy Editors in Bianca Garner and Steve Schweighofer. As the site continues to grow, the high demand to maintain and expand on the vast content means that Filmotomy now wants to acquire new film writers. Filmotomy is not like the average website reporting on the […]

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Edgar Wright’s Guide To Opening a Movie

Edgar Wright

Edgar Wright is nothing if not entertaining. His kinetic style of filmmaking often reflects not only the action sequences, but also the almost wholesome depiction of the everyday characters. People like you or me. Folk we know. Granted, his plot lines involve bank robberies, aliens, zombies, super villains, cults – but in each one is […]

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I Am Jack’s Broken Heart: Fight Club Review

Fight Club is an absolute insane movie to try to explain and it’s impact on popular culture at this point is complete. Based off the 1996 book by writer Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club follows a singular narrator played by Edward Norton through corporate life and the drone of existence in modern America. Unable to sleep, […]

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Tim Roth Directs The War Zone With Brutal Truth

*** SOME SPOILERS *** In the opening scenes of the 1999 bare-bones British drama The War Zone, some effort is made to establish what might well be a realistic, relatively well-rounded family. There’s a whiff of familiarity that Dad is walking around the house without a shirt on. That  heavily pregnant Mum’s waters break on […]

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The Force is Strong with This One (Really!) – In Defense of The Phantom Menace

Star Wars

1999 is remembered for many things in film: the passing of one of cinema’s legendary storytellers in Stanley Kubrick. The ascension of Paul Thomas Anderson via his multi-layered drama Magnolia. Two sibling writer-directors flipping the script on what science fiction (and to a larger extent, film in general) could be with The Matrix. It was also the […]

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East is East, A Room for Romeo Brass Make For Perfect 1999 Movie Double Bill

“But there is neither East nor West, Border, nor Breed, nor Birth.” – Rudyard Kipling Perusing through the vast rang of movies from 1999 is in itself an enduring, compelling journey. Getting to revisit some fine films from the end of the century. A time for the movie world to change in many ways, as […]

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We All Hate Our Job – Office Space Review

Positioned between the technological boom of the 90’s and the panic of the upcoming Y2K scare, Office Space is a satirical comedy about the banality of corporate life and the soul crushing existence of a cubicle career. Peter, Michael, and Samir all work at Initech, a technology company that updates bank software for the year […]

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Trapped in the Rat Race: Revisiting Lynne Ramsay’s Ratcatcher

With the recent release of You Were Never Really Here, and the Rewind year at Filmotomy, it seems only fitting to revisit Lynne Ramsay’s debut film which came out in the glorious year of film, 1999. Ratcatcher was screened in the Un Certain Regard section at the 1999 Cannes Film Festival and won its director […]

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Life Interrupted: The Journey to get The Virgin Suicides from Page to Screen

“I never thought I would be a film-maker. It wasn’t something I ever planned. I had so many interests but I just couldn’t find one medium that really clicked for me. Then I made a short film, Lick the Star in 1998, and it brought together all the things I loved.” Sofia Coppola, The Guardian It seems […]

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