For Your Consideration: Rachel Morrison, Best Cinematography, MUDBOUND

This is the closest a woman has gotten to being nominated for an Oscar in that impenetrable fortress of a category. As Morrison said when she was accepting her Kodak Vision Award in 2013, “It baffles me how women remain such a minority in an industry whose primary currency is visualizing human emotion….”

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For Your Consideration: Christopher Nolan, Best Original Screenplay, Dunkirk

With the weight of Dunkirk‘s award season run seemingly on the shoulders of Christopher Nolan as Best Director, I wanted to bring his chances for a Best Original Screenplay nomination to the table. Too many dismiss the writing because of the scale and style of the picture, that it will harm Dunkirk‘s chances for Best […]

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Steven Spielberg Films Ranked: 10-6

In the late 1970s, George Lucas and Steven Spielberg were buddies. And both were embarking on huge, game-changing science fiction epics. Believe it or not it was Lucas who was worried about the success of his film, Star Wars, and believed Spielberg was the one with the huge hit on his hands with Close Encounters of […]

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Steven Spielberg Films Ranked: 15-11

Once upon a time, in the condition that Warner Bros. utilize a cast primarily from the UK and Ireland, J. K. Rowling agreed to sell the movie film rights for the first four of her Harry Potter books. Steven Spielberg was one name thrown into the magical ring to potentially direct the first film, but anticipating […]

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Steven Spielberg’s ‘Private’ Saving Private Ryan

Saving Private Ryan has been a game-changer since the day it came out. It changed the way battles were filmed; the D-Day sequence was studied and emulated by filmmakers from Ridley Scott to Peter Jackson to Quentin Tarantino. It changed our concept of war realism, maybe all realism. It changed our reverence for World War […]

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No Gold For Steven Spielberg’s The Color Purple

At the very beginning of 1985’s The Color Purple, there is an affecting scene where a woman gives birth. While shooting that very scene (the film had the clandestine title Moonsong during production), a certain actress, Amy Irving, was about to go into labor herself – incidentally this would be Max, the first child of […]

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Indiana Jones and the Nasty, Mean-Spirited Sequel

I’m just going to come right out and say it: I really did not enjoy sitting through Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. I can’t, for the life of me, understand why the big follow-up to Raiders of the Lost Ark has its share of defenders, but cry in outrage how 2008’s Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the […]

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Spielberg’s Ark: The Masterful Schindler’s List

In Language and Silence (1967), Cambridge University’s George Steiner famously suggested that, because the Holocaust “lies outside speech as it lies outside reason,” the proper response to it is silence. Far more than the unimpeachable Shoah (1985), Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List stands as both confirmation and refutation of Steiner’s dictum. Janusz Kaminski’s crisp cinematography makes […]

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Masterpiece Memo: Spielberg’s ‘Close Encounter’ With Greatness

Da. Da. Da. Da. Daaa. Those five notes are perhaps some of the most iconic in cinematic history. After all of the human drama and stunning visuals leave you of Steven Spielberg’s 1977 classic Close Encounters of the Third Kind, the brain hangs onto the most simple aspect of the film. And that’s completely by […]

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A.I. – Spielberg’s Greatest Fairytale

It has taken over a decade for critics to finally realise just how great A.I. Artificial Intelligence actually is. A.I. was Stanley Kubrick’s pet project, until he passed away and Steven Spielberg took over. Upon its initial release, many critics and audience members didn’t quite know how to respond it, with some critics dismissing it […]

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Steven Spielberg Week: How To Watch His Movies – 2010s

The most recent batch of Spielberg films (not including the newly released The Post) deliver heavy, but audience-friendly political journeys (including The Post), a film with heavy sentiment, as well as two visits into animated, including a collaboration with Peter Jackson. It’s incredible to see how far this filmmaker has come, five decades of a […]

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Steven Spielberg Week: How To Watch His Movies – 2000s

A huge return to an unforgettable adventure franchise, a sci-fi drama once meant for a certain Stanley Kubrick, a Tom Cruise double bill, a Tom Hank double bill, a powerful true story from the 1970s, and a gripping remake of a terror classic. There are some doubters, and of course some disappointments here, but not a […]

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Steven Spielberg Week: How To Watch His Movies – 1990s

In the 1990s Spielberg would conquer both box office and Academy Awards in the very same year. All his films from then decade are easily available to stream online, and links to multiple platforms are all below. As you may know, some of these come highly recommended for the kids, some not so much. I’ll […]

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Steven Spielberg Week: How To Watch His Movies – 1980s

Many of us have a nostalgic fondness of the 80s, grew up with Spielberg’s legacy as he showed us true cinematic adventure and young emotional resonance. The next batch of the filmmakers movies are all from this decade. And each one is out there for you to watch. So don’t waste any more time, get […]

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Steven Spielberg Week: How To Watch His Movies – 1970s

So here we are arriving at Steven Spielberg Week. I know you’ve been looking forward to this. But wait, you haven’t seen Schindler’s List? You want to cry your eyes out to E.T. again? Can’t remember Matt Damon being in Saving Private Ryan? We got you covered. All of Spielberg’s feature films are available to […]

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The Square Takes Top Prizes At The 30th European Film Awards

Moments ago, in Berlin, The Square was named the Best European Film of the year at the 30th annual awards, which was kind what was expected at this stage given the Palme d’Or winner was also the recipient of European Comedy, Best Actor for Claes Bang, as well a double for Ruben Östlund who won Screenplay […]

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Vote: Ranking The Films Of Steven Spielberg

For those that don’t know yet, 11 – 17 December is Steven Spielberg Week at Filmotomy. I’m not one for ranking movies generally, it’s a tough task at the best of times, especially with a film-maker who has such an abundance of excellent work under his belt. So, another mass vote is in order to […]

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Genre Blast: Beat It! It’s the Cops! – Police Genre

Whether it’s a frustrated and dedicated maverick taking on a situation alone – often against orders – or an escalated paramilitary effort launched due to the scale and sophistication of the lawbreakers, we like our law enforcement tales precise and no-nonsense.

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Review: Dee Rees’ Essential Mudbound

Mudbound is many things at once: A demonstration of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, a portrait of racial tensions in rural America, and a universal telling of everyday people trying to live through the trials of today to build a better tomorrow. Yet the film is one thing as well: Poetic. Despite its heavy subject matter, it […]

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For Your Consideration: Beach Rats, Best Cinematography, Helene Louvart

What makes great cinematography? Is it colorful lighting? Is it long tracking shots? Well, while those things do help create a visually intriguing experience, what ultimately makes great cinematography is its ability to act as a form of storytelling. It is up to the camera to try and translate the words that aren’t written in […]

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