Performance: Harriet Andersson in Through a Glass Darkly

I recently gushed over Harriet Andersson for her career-defining performance in Summer with Monika. A catapult, too, for her director Ingmar Bergman. I fell in love  (again) with Andersson the actress, her character, the whole persona. The Swedish actress would mesmerize me when I first came to see her work, from a film eight years […]

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2018 Half-Time Report: Peter Rabbit

2018 is rapidly generating blockbusters with the new Avengers: Infinity War (2018) taking the box office by storm and Disney’s greatly anticipated Incredibles 2 (2018). On a smaller, but just as epic scale, is our fluffy bunny hero Peter Rabbit who hopped onto our screens earlier this year. James Corden plays the loveable memorable character […]

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Performance: Max Von Sydow in The Seventh Seal

Antonious Block (Max Von Sydow) is the Knight who returns from the Crusades to only find Death waiting for him on his home soil, in Ingmar Bergman’s The Seventh Seal. One of many films that dealt with the question of mortality, god, and philosophy to come out in the post World War Two era. Block […]

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Laura Gets a Cat

Next month I am going to be 29, *gulps* and I often feel that I haven’t really done much with my life, I am not a home owner, I’m not married with children and at this point in time I don’t even own a car! I’m not alone, there are many millennial’s out there who […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary: The Silence

This is entry number 6 and I decided to watch The Silence (1963), which is the third in a series of thematically related films, following Through a Glass Darkly (1961) and Winter Light (1963), which is sometimes considered a trilogy by critics and cinephiles alike. Ingmar Bergman himself stated that ”These three films deal with […]

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Searching for Whitney: Kevin Mcdonald’s New Documentary Whitney

Whitney Houston was an icon, a film star, a pop legend, a woman who overcame the odds to rise to the top of stardom. But behind that dazzling smile she was a broken, fragile soul who was always performing as someone else for the world, and never fully embracing who she truly was. Whitney’s life […]

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Filmotomy Podcast Episode 34: Cinema 2018 Half-Time Whistle

This timely podcast episode hits the halfway mark of the year 2018. So we are due a half-time report, to assess the year in film so far. Bianca Garner is in the hosting chair once again, and joined by Robin Write and Rob Motto. Here they chat about their favorite films of the year so […]

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Exclusive Interview: Tony Zierra & Elizabeth Yoffe, Filmworker

Those who follow me on Twitter will probably know that one of my favourite films this year so far has been Tony Zierra’s Filmworker produced by Elizabeth Yoffe. The documentary tells the compelling and engaging story of Leon Vitali, a young actor who gave up his life and career in order to become Stanley Kubrick’s […]

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Happy 4th Of July – The Best Vietnam War Films

For those of us residing in The United States Of America, Wednesday is July, 4th the day we celebrate our independence from England. Patriotism, military service, and historic events all surround the holiday and I thought it was a great opportunity to highlight the best films regarding The Vietnam War. The war shaped the mood […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary- Hour of the Wolf

This is entry number 5 and we are half way through my challenge to watch 10 films by Ingmar Bergman. Although I must admit I have been watching other films by the director as well, simply to fill in the gaps. Even though, I won’t be writing about Persona, I think watching it along with […]

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For the Sake of Movies: Kurosawa’s Letter to Bergman

During the research for my previous article regarding Stanley Kubrick’s fan letter to Ingmar Bergman, I came across another letter penned by a famous director, Akira Kurosawa. I thought I would discuss it in the similar fashion as I did for the Kubrick letter and share it with our readers, as I find this stuff […]

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Don’t Look, Don’t Look: Hereditary and the Scene of the Year

* * * Potential Spoilers * * * Going into Hereditary, I was anticipating the average jump scare, loud bang “boo!” fest. The kind of film I usually loathe because I find them to be a cheat. Hereditary begins a slow burner, which builds up to a soul destroying, truly horrific scene that changes the […]

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The House That Bergman Built: A Review of Trespassing Bergman

There’s no denying that Ingmar Bergman made a lasting impression on so many great filmmakers. But it’s often hard to wrap our heads around the fact that Bergman changed the entire course of cinematic history and helped to shape the landscape of filmmaking today. There’s something wonderful about seeing the likes of Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, […]

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Performance – Victor Sjostrom in Wild Strawberries

Wild Strawberries is a film about coming to terms with old age and mortality. Following a day in the life of Dr. Eberhard Isak Borg who after  living a life marked by coldness and isolation, is forced to confront the emptiness of his existence. The film’s strength lies within the performance of Victor Sjöström, who truly […]

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The Problem of Pain: Cries and Whispers Review

Pain is seemingly always around us. Whether it is the pain we inflict upon ourselves or pain that comes unannounced and undeserved, we have all met days where the feeling was visceral and crippling. What are we to do on those days? Why does such pain exist? Cries and Whispers is a film with a […]

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Kubrick the ‘Fan Boy’: Stanley’s Letter to Ingmar Bergman

I have written letters to writers I admire. Often I find myself squirming with embarrassment when I recall the words I wrote, (and I am still hurt that J.K.Rowling never replied). But I was so moved by their work that I just had to tell them. During my research for Filmotomy’s celebration to Ingmar Bergman, […]

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Hope and Despair: Paul Schrader’s First Reformed

First Reformed is a film that has been fifty years in the making. Going all the way back to the start of director Paul Schrader’s film criticism career. He wrote a book on spiritual cinema called Transcendental Style In Film that covers the work of Yasujiro Ozu, Robert Bresson, and Carl Dreyer. Schrader had not […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary – Sawdust and Tinsel

There’s something mysterious about circus life; it sounds like a life of freedom and a place where you find yourself. We have all heard of the term ”I’m going to run away to the circus”. The world of the circus is the centre of this Bergman 1953 film, Sawdust and Tinsel, and starts off with the circus’ […]

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The Stylistic Fit of Robert Altman

If one were to consider the case, it is almost interesting to consider where Robert Altman fits in the pantheon on the American cinema canon, especially in relation to modern times and looking at where his films are in those regards. A true iconoclast of the craft and profession, Altman has had a career has […]

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Bee’s Bergman Diary – Through A Glass Darkly

The next entry for my challenge, and it really doesn’t feel like a challenge at all. I am really enjoying watching these films, which have been on my to-watch-list for so long. With so many Bergman films to pick, I decided to watch Through a Glass Darkly next, which I have been meaning to watch […]

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Robbin’ Banks and Hearts: Thieves Like Us

– – – Contains Spoilers – – – America has always been obsessed with the doomed romantic tale of the bank robbing couple on the run. It is their version of ”Robin Hood” or ”Dick Turpin”. There’s something enigmatic about the anti-hero who doesn’t follow the rules of the establishment. Robs from the greedy bankers, […]

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